perlocution

(redirected from Perlocutionary)

perlocution

(ˌpɜːlɒˈkjuːʃən)
n
(Linguistics) philosophy the effect that someone has by uttering certain words, such as frightening a person. Also called: perlocutionary act Compare illocution
[C16 (in the obsolete sense: the action of speaking): from Medieval or New Latin perlocūtiō; see per-, locution]
ˌperloˈcutionary adj
Translations
Perlokution
perlocutie
References in periodicals archive ?
Alternatively, the perlocutionary effect of warning can be expressed by making the addressee aware of the negative consequences of his/her action (causing him/ her to be warned).
Observing the cooperative principle, the interlocutor (Delaney) carries out this speech act to completion by a perlocutionary act: she takes the spider out of the trampoline.
Another useful concept in Austin's work is that of a perlocutionary act or the effect of the speech act.
I am speaking of the antidemocratic outcome that a proportion of the individuals targeted by hate speech will not contribute to public discourse nor participate in the formation of public opinion, or will do so but with speech the content of which has been warped, or will do so but without the ability or power to achieve intended illocutionary or perlocutionary effects.
Austin's theory on perlocutionary act is still very relevant because advertisement is a form of capitalist signs attempting to persuade people to buy their products as much as possible.
In her recent essay "Performative Agency," Judith Butler argues that while economic speculation is most certainly performative, we must think of it as perlocutionary rather than illocutionary (151-53).
In Austin's terminology, its verses equate to a perlocutionary speech act; that is, an utterance with consequence (838).
They are true speech acts or utterances that aim to carry out three fundamental tasks: locutionary, illocutionary, and perlocutionary.
While, on one level, speaking or writing is already an action (a locutionary act), on another level, we also perform actions in saying something (an illocutionary act) or by--or in consequence of--saying something (a perlocutionary act).
Finally, doing something by saying something is a perlocutionary act.
Austin's view of the perlocutionary (effect on the listener) and illocutionary (intent of the speaker) force of certain kinds of speech acts.
Jay concludes that one of the possible limitations of the "in context' work of authors such as Quentin Skinner and the so-called Cambridge School is given by the impossibility to reduce the perlocutionary effect of events to the illocutionary intentions of the authors.