perlocution

(redirected from Perlocutionary act)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

perlocution

(ˌpɜːlɒˈkjuːʃən)
n
(Linguistics) philosophy the effect that someone has by uttering certain words, such as frightening a person. Also called: perlocutionary act Compare illocution
[C16 (in the obsolete sense: the action of speaking): from Medieval or New Latin perlocūtiō; see per-, locution]
ˌperloˈcutionary adj
Translations
Perlokution
perlocutie
References in periodicals archive ?
Sadock (1974) claims that the act of warning can be an illocutionary and perlocutionary act at the same time because the concept of warning is not necessary to create a sense of awareness in the hearer.
Another useful concept in Austin's work is that of a perlocutionary act or the effect of the speech act.
Austin's theory on perlocutionary act is still very relevant because advertisement is a form of capitalist signs attempting to persuade people to buy their products as much as possible.
However, whether an illocutionary or perlocutionary act, the virtuous wife's death is a physical action set into motion by wards, and it instills a longing for justice in the reader, convincing us that the verbal command enacts the very deed it encourages.
Like an illocutionary act, a perlocutionary act invokes an evaluation along felicitous or infelicitous lines rather than true or false.
A perlocutionary act is realized in the form of the effect of an utterance on the listener.
Finally the perlocutionary act is the cause of change or the creation of an effect in the mind of the hearer as a result of producing an utterance which Austin describes as securing uptake".
For Austin (1975), a perlocutionary act is a speech act that produces "certain consequential effects upon the feelings, thoughts, or actions of the audience, or of the speaker, or of other persons: and it may be done with the design, intention, or purpose of producing them," (p.
A locutionary act is the utterance of sounds that have sense and reference and therefore meaning; the illocutionary act--Austin himself talked rather of illocutionary force--is what the speaker does or intends to do in saying what he or she says; whereas the perlocutionary act or force is what the speaker achieves through saying what is said.
It is also, as Santiago Nieves shares, "an act of vindication" to see the perlocutionary act of discomfort that the embassy official experiences by listening to his words.
A perfectly perlocutionary act in Habermas's complex democracy, and strategies of modern law, is bargaining.
that is both an illocutionary act (that is, it has an intended meaning) and a perlocutionary act (that is, it has an actual effect on the listener, which may or may not be that intended).