deacon

(redirected from Permanent diaconate)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

dea·con

 (dē′kən)
n.
1. A cleric ranking just below a priest in the Anglican, Eastern Orthodox, and Roman Catholic churches.
2. A lay assistant to a Protestant minister.
3. Used as a title prefixed to the surname of such a person: Deacon Brown.

[Middle English deken, from Old English dīacon, from Late Latin diāconus, perhaps from Greek diākonos, attendant, minister.]

deacon

(ˈdiːkən)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) (in the Roman Catholic and other episcopal churches) an ordained minister ranking immediately below a priest
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) (in Protestant churches) a lay official appointed or elected to assist the minister, esp in secular affairs
3. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) Scot the president of an incorporated trade or body of craftsmen in a burgh
[Old English, ultimately from Greek diakonos servant]
ˈdeaconˌship n

dea•con

(ˈdi kən)

n.
1. (in hierarchical churches) a member of the clerical order next below that of a priest.
2. (in other churches) an appointed or elected officer having variously defined duties.
[before 900; Middle English deken, Old English diacon < Late Latin diāconus < Greek diakonos servant, minister, deacon]
dea′con•ship`, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deacon - a Protestant layman who assists the ministerdeacon - a Protestant layman who assists the minister
church officer - a church official
deaconess - a woman deacon
2.deacon - a cleric ranking just below a priest in Christian churches; one of the Holy Orders
clergyman, man of the cloth, reverend - a member of the clergy and a spiritual leader of the Christian Church
Holy Order, Order - (usually plural) the status or rank or office of a Christian clergyman in an ecclesiastical hierarchy; "theologians still disagree over whether `bishop' should or should not be a separate Order"

deacon

noun
Related words
adjective diaconal
Translations
diakoni
助祭執事輔祭

deacon

[ˈdiːkən] Ndiácono m

deacon

[ˈdiːkən] ndiacre m

deacon

nDiakon m; (= elder)Kirchenälteste(r) m

deacon

[ˈdiːkn] ndiacono
References in periodicals archive ?
Michael Duignan, national director of the permanent diaconate in Ireland, who was unavailable for comment, as were a number of diocesan directors for the permanent diaconate.
The permanent diaconate may attract a certain kind of individual, and future studies need to explore their personality structure.
IN AUGUST, BISHOP KIERAN O'Reilly of Killaloe, Ireland, announced that the diocese would be instituting the permanent diaconate, which is only open to men.
In addition to a small but expanding--cadre of married priests, Catholics also have a rising number of married ordained men in the permanent diaconate.
WORCESTER - Three men will be ordained to the permanent diaconate and another will be ordained to the transitional diaconate at a Mass Saturday at the Cathedral of St.
assisted in the editing of the new edition of the Lexikon fur Theologie und Kirche, in producing Diaconia in Christo (1962) that led to the restoration of the permanent diaconate, and in overseeing the previously mentioned Commentary.
The pressure to ordain women to the Catholic priesthood and permanent diaconate is growing.
Telling the intriguing story of Quander's diagnosis of diabetes shortly before his sixth birthday, and his dedicated and courageous pursuit to live a fulfilled and purposeful life, The Quander Quality is the inspirational and deeply personal history of how Quander eventually became on of the sixteen men ordained in the United States when the Permanent Diaconate was revived after an eight-hundred-year hiatus.
Bishop Kevin said: "The Permanent Diaconate is a unique institution; Bishop Ambrose showed great vision in its reinstatement.
The Permanent Diaconate is a unique institution and my predecessor Bishop Ambrose showed great vision in its re-instatement.
Edmonton--The Archbishop of Edmonton, Thomas Collins, has announced that he intends to begin a program for a permanent diaconate.
The form of a permanent diaconate would be such as to free other ministers (presbyters and bishops) to perform the functions which more appropriately belong to their distinctive calling.

Full browser ?