hypercapnia

(redirected from Permissive hypercapnia)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

hy·per·cap·ni·a

 (hī′pər-kăp′nē-ə)
n.
1. An abnormally high concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood, usually caused by acute respiratory failure from conditions such as asthma and obstructive pulmonary disease. It can lead to seizures and death if acute and untreated.
2. Carbon dioxide poisoning due to abnormally high concentrations of carbon dioxide in an organism's environment.

[hyper- + Greek kapnos, smoke + -ia.]

hypercapnia

(ˌhaɪpəˈkæpnɪə)
n
(Medicine) an excess of carbon dioxide in the blood. Also: hypercarbia
[from hyper- + Greek kapnos smoke]
ˌhyperˈcapnic adj

hy•per•cap•ni•a

(ˌhaɪ pərˈkæp ni ə)
n.
the presence of an excessive amount of carbon dioxide in the blood.
[1905–10; hyper- + Greek kapn(ós) smoke + -ia]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hypercapnia - the physical condition of having the presence of an abnormally high level of carbon dioxide in the circulating blood
physical condition, physiological condition, physiological state - the condition or state of the body or bodily functions
asphyxia - a condition in which insufficient or no oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged on a ventilatory basis; caused by choking or drowning or electric shock or poison gas
acapnia, hypocapnia - a state in which the level of carbon dioxide in the blood is lower than normal; can result from deep or rapid breathing
Translations

hy·per·cap·ni·a

n. hipercapnia, cantidad excesiva de dióxido de carbono en la sangre.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moore and her colleagues said strategies used in the nonpregnant population with ARDS might not be appropriate in pregnant mothers for two reasons: permissive hypercapnia may harm the fetus; and prone positioning can be difficult for women in late-term pregnancy.
Mathematical models easily demonstrated the critical importance of minute ventilation in driving dynamic hyperinflation, and gave a potent rationale for pursuing a strategy of permissive hypercapnia in the ventilatory support of severe airflow obstruction--long before its use in ARDS.
2] within normal limits but rather allowed for permissive hypercapnia (Brower, 2002; Lanken, 2005; Ventilation with lower tidal, 2000).
Furthermore, adjusting some treatments to produce abnormal physiological parameters leads to better outcomes, as is the case with permissive hypercapnia in acute respiratory distress syndrome (7).
Over the years, as clinicians have learned how to utilize it, permissive hypercapnia has been finding a place in healthcare.
Permissive hypercapnia should not be used in patients with elevated intra-cranial pressure, as hypercapnia may increase cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood volume and further elevate ICP.