persuasion

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per·sua·sion

 (pər-swā′zhən)
n.
1. The act of persuading or the state of being persuaded: "The persuasion of a democracy to big changes is at best a slow process" (Harold J. Laski).
2. The ability or power to persuade: "Three foremost aids to persuasion which occur to me are humility, concentration, and gusto" (Marianne Moore).
3. A strongly held opinion; a conviction: "He had a strong persuasion that Likeman was wrong" (H.G. Wells).
4.
a. A body of religious beliefs; a religion: worshipers of various persuasions.
b. A party, faction, or group holding to a particular set of ideas or beliefs.
5. Informal Kind; sort: "the place where ... rockers of any gender or persuasion can become megastars" (Christopher John Farley).

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin persuāsiō, persuāsiōn-, from persuāsus, past participle of persuādēre, to persuade; see persuade.]

persuasion

(pəˈsweɪʒən)
n
1. the act of persuading or of trying to persuade
2. the power to persuade
3. the state of being persuaded; strong belief
4. an established creed or belief, esp a religious one
5. a sect, party, or faction
[C14: from Latin persuāsiō; see persuade]

per•sua•sion

(pərˈsweɪ ʒən)

n.
1. the act of persuading or seeking to persuade.
2. power to persuade; persuasive force.
3. the state or fact of being persuaded or convinced.
4. a deep conviction or belief.
5. a form or system of belief, esp. religious belief: the Quaker persuasion.
6. a sect, group, or faction.
7. kind; sort.
[1350–1400; Middle English persuacioun (< Anglo-French, Middle French) < Latin persuāsiō; see persuade, -tion]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.persuasion - the act of persuading (or attempting to persuade)persuasion - the act of persuading (or attempting to persuade); communication intended to induce belief or action
communicating, communication - the activity of communicating; the activity of conveying information; "they could not act without official communication from Moscow"
line - persuasive but insincere talk that is usually intended to deceive or impress; "`let me show you my etchings' is a rather worn line"; "he has a smooth line but I didn't fall for it"; "that salesman must have practiced his fast line of talk"
arm-twisting - persuasion by the use of direct personal pressure; "some gentle arm-twisting produced the desired result"; "no amount of arm-twisting will get me to agree"
canvassing, electioneering, bell ringing - persuasion of voters in a political campaign
exhortation, incitement - the act of exhorting; an earnest attempt at persuasion
proselytism - the practice of proselytizing
sloganeering - persuasion by means of empty slogans
prompting, suggestion - persuasion formulated as a suggestion
weapon, artillery - a means of persuading or arguing; "he used all his conversational weapons"
dissuasion - persuading not to do or believe something; talking someone out of a belief or an intended course of action
2.persuasion - a personal belief or judgment that is not founded on proof or certaintypersuasion - a personal belief or judgment that is not founded on proof or certainty; "my opinion differs from yours"; "I am not of your persuasion"; "what are your thoughts on Haiti?"
idea - a personal view; "he has an idea that we don't like him"
judgment, judgement, mind - an opinion formed by judging something; "he was reluctant to make his judgment known"; "she changed her mind"
belief - any cognitive content held as true
eyes - opinion or judgment; "in the eyes of the law"; "I was wrong in her eyes"
parti pris, preconceived idea, preconceived notion, preconceived opinion, preconception, prepossession - an opinion formed beforehand without adequate evidence; "he did not even try to confirm his preconceptions"
pole - one of two divergent or mutually exclusive opinions; "they are at opposite poles"; "they are poles apart"
political sympathies, politics - the opinion you hold with respect to political questions

persuasion

noun
1. urging, influencing, conversion, inducement, exhortation, wheedling, enticement, cajolery, blandishment, inveiglement It took all her powers of persuasion to induce them to stay.
2. belief, views, opinion, party, school, side, camp, faith, conviction, faction, cult, sect, creed, denomination, tenet, school of thought, credo, firm belief, certitude, fixed opinion people who are of a different political persuasion
Quotations
"By persuading others, we convince ourselves" [Junius Public Advertiser]

persuasion

noun
1. Something believed or accepted as true by a person:
2. A system of religious belief:
3. Those who accept and practice a particular religious belief:
4. Informal. A class that is defined by the common attribute or attributes possessed by all its members:
Translations
إقْناع
přesvědčování
overtalelse
meggyőzés
fortölur
presviedčanie
prepričevanje
ikna etme/edilmerazı etme/edilme

persuasion

[pəˈsweɪʒən] N
1. (= act) → persuasión f
his powers of persuasion were formidablesus dotes de persuasión or convicción eran extraordinarios
all he needs is a little gentle or friendly persuasion (lit, fig) → sólo hace falta aplicarle unas suaves técnicas de persuasión
I wouldn't need much persuasion to stop working nightscostaría poco convencerme de or para que dejara de trabajar por la noche
2. (= belief) (Rel) → creencia f (Pol) → ideología f
sport brings people of all races and persuasions togetherel deporte une a la gente de todas las razas y creencias
politicians of every persuasionpolíticos mpl de todas las ideologías
I'm not of that persuasionno soy de esa opinión, no es ésa mi opinión

persuasion

[pərˈsweɪʒən] n
(= urging) → persuasion f
You could, with a little persuasion, get some of these people to help → Avec un peu de persuasion, vous pourriez obtenir de ces personnes qu'elles vous aident.
(political)convictions fpl
people of all political persuasions → des gens de toutes convictions politiques
(religious)confession f
those who are not of the Roman Catholic persuasion → ceux qui ne sont pas de confession catholique

persuasion

n
(= persuading)Überredung f; advertising uses many subtle means of persuasiondie Werbung arbeitet mit vielen subtilen Überzeugungsmechanismen; her powers of persuasionihre Überredungskünste; she tried every possible means of persuasion to get him to agreesie setzte ihre ganze Überredungskunst ein, um seine Zustimmung zu erlangen; I don’t need much persuasion to stop workingman braucht mich nicht lange zu überreden, damit ich aufhöre zu arbeiten
(= persuasiveness)Überzeugungskraft f
(= belief)Überzeugung f; (= sect, denomination)Glaube m, → Glaubensrichtung f; I am not of that persuasion (= don’t believe that)davon bin ich nicht überzeugt; (= don’t belong to that sect)ich gehöre nicht diesem Glauben an; and others of that persuasionund andere, die dieser Überzeugung anhängen; to be of left-wing persuasion, to have left-wing persuasionslinke Ansichten haben

persuasion

[pəˈsweɪʒn] n
a. (persuading) → persuasione f
b. (creed) → convinzione f, credo

persuade

(pəˈsweid) verb
1. to make (someone) (not) do something, by arguing with him or advising him. We persuaded him (not) to go.
2. to make (someone) certain (that something is the case); to convince. We eventually persuaded him that we were serious.
perˈsuasion (-ʒən) noun
the act of persuading. He gave in to our persuasion and did what we wanted him to do.
perˈsuasive (-siv) adjective
able to persuade. He is a persuasive speaker; His arguments are persuasive.
perˈsuasively adverb
perˈsuasiveness noun

per·sua·sion

n. persuasión, técnica terapéutica que consiste en un acercamiento racional al paciente para orientarle en sus actuaciones.
References in classic literature ?
If I had loved you less dearly, I might have had the courage to say this in your presence -- but how could I trust myself to resist your persuasions, and to bear the sight of your distress?
This resolution, let me hasten to assure you, has not been brought about by any persuasions of mine.
If the members of a religious persuasion built a chapel there - as the members of eighteen religious persuasions had done - they made it a pious warehouse of red brick, with sometimes (but this is only in highly ornamental examples) a bell in a birdcage on the top of it.
He bolts down all events, all creeds, and beliefs, and persuasions, all hard things visible and invisible, never mind how knobby; as an ostrich of potent digestion gobbles down bullets and gun flints.
My father, who was very ancient, had given me a competent share of learning, as far as house-education and a country free school generally go, and designed me for the law; but I would be satisfied with nothing but going to sea; and my inclination to this led me so strongly against the will, nay, the commands of my father, and against all the entreaties and persuasions of my mother and other friends, that there seemed to be something fatal in that propensity of nature, tending directly to the life of misery which was to befall me.
Every time he began to think about it, he felt that he must try once more, that by kindness, tenderness, and persuasion there was still hope of saving her, of bringing her back to herself, and every day he made ready to talk to her.
Nothing less than a persuasion of universal depravity can lock up the charity of a good man; and this persuasion must lead him, I think, either into atheism, or enthusiasm; but surely it is unfair to argue such universal depravity from a few vicious individuals; nor was this, I believe, ever done by a man, who, upon searching his own mind, found one certain exception to the general rule.
Use also such persons as affect the business, wherein they are employed; for that quickeneth much; and such, as are fit for the matter; as bold men for expostulation, fair-spoken men for persuasion, crafty men for inquiry and observation, froward, and absurd men, for business that doth not well bear out itself.
She was assured of his affection; and that heart in return was solicited, which, perhaps, they pretty equally knew was already entirely his own; for, though Henry was now sincerely attached to her, though he felt and delighted in all the excellencies of her character and truly loved her society, I must confess that his affection originated in nothing better than gratitude, or, in other words, that a persuasion of her partiality for him had been the only cause of giving her a serious thought.
I'm sure you have powers of persuasion, and qualifications for amusing a gentleman, which many ladies would be glad to possess.
The only comfort he received was from this minister, who assured him that the Government, being now driven to the exercise of the extreme prerogatives of the Crown, were determined to exert them; that a proclamation would probably be out upon the morrow, giving to the military, discretionary and unlimited power in the suppression of the riots; that the sympathies of the King, the Administration, and both Houses of Parliament, and indeed of all good men of every religious persuasion, were strongly with the injured Catholics; and that justice should be done them at any cost or hazard.
I remember how my head swayed with the seas, and the horizon with the sail above it danced up and down; but I also remember as distinctly that I had a persuasion that I was dead, and that I thought what a jest it was that they should come too late by such a little to catch me in my body.