perturbation theory

(redirected from Perturbation analysis)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.
Related to Perturbation analysis: Perturbation theory

perturbation theory

n.
A set of mathematical methods often used to obtain approximate solutions to equations for which no exact solution is possible, feasible, or known.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this paper we present a complete perturbation analysis of the [H.
Using the nonlocal perturbation analysis techniques developed in [8, 9], nonlocal perturbation bounds are then derived.
In this paper, we use the local perturbation analysis technique developed in [9] to establish such bound that are tighter than those in [1].
But, knowing that turbulence is fundamentally non-linear, the team decided a non-linear perturbation analysis was exactly what was called for.
Other topics of the 15 papers include dynamic spectrum access, perturbation analysis for spectrum sharing, optimal RF beamforming for MIMO cognitive networks, computation of performance parameters, and emergency cognitive radio ad hoc networks.
The project has three components: (1) a study of variation in longevity, focusing on perturbation analysis of Markov chain models for mortality, (2) an analysis of the reward structure of populations, to quantify individual stochasticity in reproduction and other properties, and (3) the development of models to incorporate heterogeneity and stochasticity into branching process models and diffusion models.
Yih (1967) used a long-wave perturbation analysis to show that two-layer, viscosity-stratified plane Poiseuille flow and plane Couette flow can be unstable for arbitrarily small Reynolds numbers.
The starting point for the perturbation analysis is the two-dimensional flow driven by uniform flow in the primary slot.
In this paper we study the perturbation analysis for eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrix polynomials of degree m
Since the polynomial eigenvalue problems typically arise from physical modelling, including numerical discretization methods such as finite element modelling [10, 31], and since the eigenvalue problem is usually solved with numerical methods that are subject to round-off as well as approximation errors, it is very important to study the perturbation analysis of these problems.
We assume the reader to be familiar with the concept of mixed relative perturbation analysis and only recall the customized notation for sharp first-order analysis introduced in [18] and the rules for propagating perturbations.