Perugia

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Pe·ru·gia

 (pə-ro͞o′jə, -jē-ə, pĕ-ro͞o′jä)
A city of central Italy on a hill overlooking the Tiber River north of Rome. An important Etruscan settlement, it fell to the Romans c. 310 bc and became a Lombard duchy in ad 592 and a free city in the 12th century. Perugia was later the artistic center of Umbria and is today a commercial, industrial, and tourist center.

Pe·ru′gian adj. & n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Perugia

(pəˈruːdʒə; Italian peˈruːdʒa)
n
1. (Placename) a city in central Italy, in Umbria: centre of the Umbrian school of painting (15th century); university (1308); Etruscan and Roman remains. Pop: 149 125 (2001). Ancient name: Perusia
2. (Placename) Lake Perugia another name for (Lake) Trasimene
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Pe•ru•gia

(pəˈru dʒə, -dʒi ə)

n.
a city in Umbria, in central Italy. 147,602.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Riots threatened in the city, and the cardinal began to regret his behaviour: T would have left it where it was if I could have foreseen the anger of the Perugians,' he wrote in a private letter.
Ciriaco's text, which follows below, belongs to the same orbit of Donatello's equestrian monument: Stefano Gattamelata of Narni supreme commander of the Venetian army, joining in a military alliance with the Church in Reggio Emilia, routed the Abruzzesi; in an unexpected victory put to flight the Perugians and the remaining forces of the enemy; in the Ligurian War he blocked Niccolo Piccinino, chasing him across the Adige; and having transported an enormous fleet over the steep slopes of Mount Penede to Lake Garda, he avenged the defection of Verona and having liberated Bergamo and Brescia from the siege, he secured the Venetian Republic, shattered and wavering as it was from a multitude of defeats.
The in-form Perugians can account for Verona, who have rolled over in most of their away games this term.