Peter I


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Peter I

Known as "Peter the Great." 1672-1725.
Russian czar (1682-1725) who extended his territory around the Baltic and Caspian shores and reformed the administration of the state. He founded the city of St. Petersburg (1703) and moved the capital there, where it remained until 1918.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Peter I

n
(Biography) known as Peter the Great. 1672–1725, tsar of Russia (1682–1725), who assumed sole power in 1689. He introduced many reforms in government, technology, and the western European ideas. He also acquired new territories for Russia in the Baltic and founded the new capital of St Petersburg (1703)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Noun1.Peter I - czar of Russia who introduced ideas from western Europe to reform the government; he extended his territories in the Baltic and founded St. Petersburg (1682-1725)
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References in classic literature ?
Of course, it also shows that Peter is ever so old, but he is really always the same age, so that does not matter in the least.
The factory, which was called the Imperial Peterhof Factory back in the day, also helped build Peter I's vision for a capital city - St.
Unlike studies that focus on the end of the "tragic dynasty" in 1917-1918, Lindsey Hughes contends that with few exceptions [1730, 1825, 1905] the Romanovs enjoyed the unreserved support of the nobility and peasantry until World War I, even as they imposed a process of Europeanization on traditional Russia, especially under Peter I and Catherine II, that elevated Russia to great power status and bequeathed a flourishing and at times oppositionist culture in literature and the arts.
If Hughes's analysis of these four levels across three centuries imparts a certain unity and cohesiveness to the dynasty, her analysis of Peter I performs a similar function.
Among the famous names of 'Russian' Scotsmen of all times one can mention Peter I's generals and advisers Yakov Briuss (Bruce) and Patrick Gordon, the admiral Samuel Greig, the marshal Mikhail Barclay de Tolly, the poet Mikhail Lermontov, and others whose achievements are less widely known.
Catherine as a martyr from the worst years of Roman persecution of Christianity facilitated the ascent of Peter I's widow, Catherine, to the throne in 1725.
Sakwa traces Putin's and Russia's dilemma to Peter I's 'forced modernisation' but, he adds, it was 'modernisation without modernity', a quandary which still shapes Russian life.
Malia begins with Russia's impression in Europe following Peter I's victory over Sweden at the battle of Poltava in 1709.