Peter Medawar


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Noun1.Peter Medawar - British immunologist (born in Brazil) who studied tissue transplants and discovered that the rejection of grafts was an immune response (1915-1987)Peter Medawar - British immunologist (born in Brazil) who studied tissue transplants and discovered that the rejection of grafts was an immune response (1915-1987)
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Auburn: Bashir Awan, Nicole Bigelow, Ryan Carrier, Jonathan Corbin, Tara Cordone, Ashley Daigneault, Amanda Dulmaine, Michael Kelley, Elizabeth Kennedy, Jennifer Lyford, Kristin Lyons, Andrew MacDonald, Theresa Mackin, Peter Medawar, Aaron Orsi, Casey Phillips, Erin Roche, Christopher Schroeder, Kayla Scott, Rosan Synal, Amanda Thibodeau, Thoa Thi Tran, Jessica Venuti, Liana Williams, Anna Yetkie
But as Nobel laureate Peter Medawar has pointed out, the utopian impulse has manifest itself as a strongly "audacious and irreverent" cultural force since the fifteenth century, as Renaissance thinking and modern science have enlarged the scope of human powers and as secular regimes have displaced ecclesiastical authority.
Wise thoughts, like one by Nobel laureate Peter Medawar, can depict the difficulties we have when trying to change others' minds.
Another Nobel Prize winner was Sir Peter Medawar, Mason Professor of Zoology at the university, who received the Nobel Prize for Medicine for discovering acquired immunological tolerance in 1960 - work that advanced transplant surgery.
The Medawar Prize is funded through an endowment provided by Novartis Pharma AG and honors Sir Peter Medawar who has often been called "the founding father of transplant immunology.
When the Nobel-winning British biologist Peter Medawar (1963) asked "Is the scientific paper a fraud?
A generation ago some people, like Sir Peter Medawar, worried about the "increasing tendency to use the growth rate of GNP as a measure of national welfare, well-being, and almost of moral stature".
In indignation", he recalls the words of Peter Medawar, a surgeon like he is, who went on to become an incisive social commentator: "To deride the hopes of progress is the ultimate fatuity, the last word in poverty of spirit and meanness of mind" (p.