Peterloo Massacre

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Peterloo Massacre

(ˌpiːtəˈluː)
n
(Historical Terms) an incident at St Peter's Fields, Manchester, in 1819 in which a radical meeting was broken up by a cavalry charge, resulting in about 500 injuries and 11 deaths
[C19: from St Peter's Fields + Waterloo]
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Eleven died in what became known as the Peterloo Massacre.
There are few who come through the British schools system who don't know the word Peterloo.
Hambantota should not have been the Navy Commander's Peterloo.
The letter was published on this month's anniversary of the 1819 Peterloo massacre in Manchester in which 18 people were killed and 700 wounded when the cavalry suppressed a pro-democracy and anti-poverty rally.
Which city, in August 1819, was the scene of the Peterloo Massacre?
Peterloo involved the assembly of a large crowd of citizens at St Peter's Field in Manchester.
Pointing to a divide that emerges between the "respectable press" and the "cheap radical press," Fairclough argues that from Spa Fields to Peterloo figures such as Cobbett and Flone offered hopeful accounts of sympathetic communication not only by championing the diffusion of ideas through the press, but also by printing transcripts of political gatherings that show reasonable discussion taking place even within raucous crowds.
There is some great work here, analysing the form of these particular genres and paying attention to the tactics used to rehabilitate sympathy in the wake of the Spa Field riots in 1816 and Peterloo in 1819.
The show of strength was the largest protest in the city since the 1819 Peterloo massacre, when 15 people were killed when a crowd of 80,000 demanded parliamentary reform.
Thus, we should not see, say, the Luddite Revolts or the Peterloo Massacre as abstract means of "fighting industrialization" or "forging a class consciousness.
Eleven died in what became known as the Peterloo Massacre - an ironic reference to the battle of Waterloo four years earlier.