petiole

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Related to Petioles: phyllode

pet·i·ole

 (pĕt′ē-ōl′)
n.
1. Botany The stalk by which a leaf is attached to a stem. Also called leafstalk.
2. Zoology A slender, stalklike part, as that connecting the thorax and abdomen in certain insects.

[Latin petiolus, variant of peciolus, little foot, fruit stalk, probably from *pediciolus, diminutive of pediculus; see pedicel.]

pet′i·oled′ adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

petiole

(ˈpɛtɪˌəʊl)
n
1. (Botany) the stalk by which a leaf is attached to the rest of the plant
2. (Zoology) zoology a slender stalk or stem, such as the connection between the thorax and abdomen of ants
[C18: via French from Latin petiolus little foot, from pēs foot]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pet•i•ole

(ˈpɛt iˌoʊl)

n.
1. the slender stalk by which a leaf is attached to the stem; leafstalk.
2. a stalk or peduncle, as that connecting the abdomen and thorax in wasps.
[1745–55; < New Latin petiolus, Latin petiolus,peciolus, probably for *pediciolus, diminutive of pediculus pedicle]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

pet·i·ole

(pĕt′ē-ōl′)
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.petiole - the slender stem that supports the blade of a leafpetiole - the slender stem that supports the blade of a leaf
stalk, stem - a slender or elongated structure that supports a plant or fungus or a plant part or plant organ
phyllode - an expanded petiole taking on the function of a leaf blade
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

petiole

nStängel m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

petiole

[ˈpɛtɪˌəʊl] npicciolo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
In walking across these thick beds of mimosae, a broad track was marked by the change of shade, produced by the drooping of their sensitive petioles. It is easy to specify the individual objects of admiration in these grand scenes; but it is not possible to give an adequate idea of the higher feelings of wonder, astonishment, and devotion, which fill and elevate the mind.
Subsequently, the contents present in the leaves, stems + petioles, absorption roots, and tuberous roots were added together to form the total content of each nutrient per plant; (b) Translocation Index (TI) obtained by dividing the content of each nutrient present in the aerial part by the total plant content of each nutrient, multiplied by 100; and (c) Nutrients Use Efficiency (NUE) obtained by the division between total plant dry mass and the total content of each nutrient.
Wilmer Barrera and David Picha from Louisiana State University analysed a variety of sweet potato tissue types - mature leaves, young leaves, young petioles, buds and root tissue.
Structures should include bars no thicker than the diameter of a pencil, small enough to be encircled by clematis petioles. If a structure is of bolder construction, attach chicken wire to give clematis something to wind itself around.
Indumentum hispidulous, constituted of trichomes glandular and tector, thin and stellate, colourless to whitish or orange, soft, rigid, erect, tangles, 0.5-3 mm long, distributed on the branches, pulvinus, petioles, stipite of nectary, leaflets, inflorescence axis, bracts and pedicels.
One-centimeter-long explants of leaves, petioles and nodes from field as well as in vitro shoots of S.
Phenotypic profiles were investigated through microscopic examinations of leaves, petioles, stems, and roots.
Later that day he comes in, carrying five rhubarb petioles. "I'm going to make a pie."