Petrarchan sonnet


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Related to Petrarchan sonnet: Elizabethan sonnet, Spenserian sonnet

Petrarchan sonnet

n.
A sonnet containing an octave with the rhyme scheme abbaabba and a sestet following any of various patterns such as cdecde or cdcdcd. Also called Italian sonnet.

[After Francesco Petrarch.]

Petrarchan sonnet

n
(Poetry) a sonnet form associated with the poet Petrarch, having an octave rhyming a b b a a b b a and a sestet rhyming either c d e c d e or c d c d c d. Also called: Italian sonnet

Petrar′chan son′net


n.
a sonnet form, popularized by Petrarch, consisting of an octave rhyming abbaabba, and a sestet usu. rhyming cdecde or cdcdcd.
Also called Italian sonnet.
[1905–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Petrarchan sonnet - a sonnet consisting of an octave with the rhyme pattern abbaabba, followed by a sestet with the rhyme pattern cdecde or cdcdcd
sonnet - a verse form consisting of 14 lines with a fixed rhyme scheme
References in periodicals archive ?
So, when the Petrarchan sonnet was invented, it was an attempt to create a poem with perfect proportions.
One, the Italian or Petrarchan sonnet, usually consists of an eight-line octave followed by a six-line sestet, with a rhyme scheme that is usually ABBA, ABBA, CDE, CDE.
10) Note that in the 1892 edition of Modern Love, Meredith removed this epigraph and replaced it with a Petrarchan sonnet titled "The Promise in Disturbance.
For those who haven't had the pleasure, the opening line, "We sliced the watermelon into smiles" is repeated thirteen times, with spaces after the fourth, eighth, and twelfth lines, gesturing toward the Shakespearean rather than the Petrarchan sonnet form.
Kolkovich argues that entertainments richly intersected with pastoral, the Petrarchan sonnet, and the country house poem while providing a crucial pre-history for the Stuart masque.
In fact, Shakespeare is not the first English poet who coined this rhyming pattern and should not take the credit for its coinage; however, as he was and perhaps still is one of the best English poets (if not the best), people have not only accredited it to his reputation but also made it the standard structural and rhyming pattern of the English sonnet, just as the Petrarchan sonnet is equal to Italian sonnet, although the form of Italian sonnet was not originally created by Francesco Petrarch (1304-1374).
Shakespearean sonnet content resembles the Petrarchan sonnet in tenor
In the first chapter, "At Petrarch's Tomb", Eisenbichler provides ample historical and literary contextualization for both Piccolomini's appropriation of the opening verse of the Petrarchan sonnet, "Giunto Alessandro a la famosa tomba", and of sixteenth-century Petrarchism in general, weaving definitions of key terms such as the tenzone into his account in such a way as to be informative without distracting from the flow of his intertextual, "poetic dialogue across genders, space and opinions" (3).
Brooks employs the Petrarchan sonnet, the Shakespearean sonnet, and a combination of both.
Shakespeare uses 'a fresh, new, innovative Ovid' to reinvent the Petrarchan sonnet (p.
A further intimation of just how well Du Bellay understood the implications of the sonnet form and the associations it would provoke in his readers can be seen a few years later when, after the publication of L' Olive, a number of Petrarchan sonnet sequences appeared in France and Du Bellay penned a satire of these poems under the title "Contre les Petrarquistes" (Divers jeux).
It is divided, as are many of the sonnets in this book, into two halves, each consisting of seven lines, preferring to the octave/sestet division of the traditional Petrarchan sonnet a form more perfectly balanced.