Petrarchism


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Petrarchism

a style of writing that is modeled after that of Petrarch. — Petrarchist, n. — Petrarchan, adj.
See also: Literary Style
Translations

Petrarchism

[ˈpetrɑːkɪzəm] Npetrarquismo m
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References in periodicals archive ?
The House of Life may help to regard Webster's choice to write about maternity not as inability to escape the literal, but as a conscious and critical renouncement of the metaphorical, in particular of Petrarchism and of the troping of creativity in terms of procreativity.
Chapter 6 is my favorite: in "Lyric Hermaphrodite," Long superbly examines the lyric production of the poets of Henri III of Valois, in which Petrarchism commingles with religious conflicts and horrors.
Five Studies in European Petrarchism (Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1969); G.
Evidence recently assembled by Gerard Defaux demonstrates the King's major role in the diffusion of Petrarchism in France in 1533-34 (see esp.
Professor Dubrow acknowledges, however, that Petrarchism is not a monolith and that the relation between discourse and counterdiscourse "is a closely matched and often indeterminate power struggle" (8).
Number 125 in the series Europa delle Corti, Biblioteca del Cinquencento, Valeria Finucci's edited volume on the occasion of Petrarch's 700th birthday (2004) brings together twelve essays on the poet and on Petrarchism by scholars from Italy, the United Kingdom, Ireland, and the United States.
7 in Moore's Desiring Voices: Women Sonneteers and Petrarchism (Carbondale and Edwardsville: Southern Illinois Univ.
They considered the Italian anthologies to be analogous to Petrarchan handbooks or commonplace books that helped them become proficient in the language of Petrarchism.
A Paduan "erudito," mentioned only fleetingly in the Salerno Storia della letteratura italiana for his Illustrium virorum elogia (Padua 1630-1644) and his Parnasus Euganeus (Padua, 1641) (but not for the Petrarcha Redivivus or his biography of another Paduan, the Roman historian Livy), Tomasini utilized his considerable antiquarian expertise in gathering together just about everything there was to know about Petrarch's life which had come to light in the first hundred years or so of Renaissance Petrarchism (dating from the 1530 edition of Bembo's Rime).
Although few poems by the Spanish Renaissance poet Garcilaso de la Vega imitate Petrarch directly, in this article I posit that Garcilaso's Petrarchism transcends their differences.
Moore charts in her poems in Desiring Voices: Women Sonneteers and Petrarchism (2000).