treason

(redirected from Petty treason)
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trea·son

 (trē′zən)
n.
1. The betrayal of allegiance toward one's own country, especially by committing hostile acts against it or aiding its enemies in committing such acts.
2. The betrayal of someone's trust or confidence.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman treson, from Latin trāditiō, trāditiōn-, a handing over; see tradition.]

treason

(ˈtriːzən)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) violation or betrayal of the allegiance that a person owes his sovereign or his country, esp by attempting to overthrow the government; high treason
2. any treachery or betrayal
[C13: from Old French traïson, from Latin trāditiō a handing over; see tradition, traditor]
ˈtreasonable, ˈtreasonous adj
ˈtreasonableness n
ˈtreasonably adv

trea•son

(ˈtri zən)

n.
1. the offense of acting to overthrow one's government or to harm or kill its sovereign.
2. a violation of allegiance to one's sovereign or state.
3. the betrayal of a trust or confidence; treachery.
[1175–1225; Middle English tre(i)so(u)n < Anglo-French; Old French traïson < Latin trāditiōnem, acc. of trāditiō a handing over. See tradition]
syn: treason, sedition mean disloyalty or treachery to one's country or its government. treason is any attempt to overthrow the government or impair the well-being of a state to which one owes allegiance. According to the U.S. Constitution, it is the crime of levying war against the U.S. or giving aid and comfort to its enemies. sedition is any act, writing, speech, etc., directed unlawfully against state authority, the government, or the constitution, or calculated to bring it into contempt or to incite others to hostility or disaffection; it does not amount to treason and therefore is not a capital offense.

treason

Violation of the allegiance owed to one's sovereign or state; betrayal of one's country.

Treason

See also crime.

an act of cooperating with an invader of one’s country. — collaborationist, n.
1. breach of trust, especially treachery or treason.
2. an act or instance of this. — perfidious, adj.
cowardice, treason, or disloyalty. — recreant, n., adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.treason - a crime that undermines the offender's governmenttreason - a crime that undermines the offender's government
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
2.treason - disloyalty by virtue of subversive behaviortreason - disloyalty by virtue of subversive behavior
disloyalty - the quality of being disloyal
betrayal - the quality of aiding an enemy
3.treason - an act of deliberate betrayaltreason - an act of deliberate betrayal  
knavery, dishonesty - lack of honesty; acts of lying or cheating or stealing
double cross, double-crossing - an act of betrayal; "he gave us the old double cross"; "I could no longer tolerate his impudent double-crossing"
sellout - an act of betrayal

treason

noun disloyalty, mutiny, treachery, subversion, disaffection, duplicity, sedition, perfidy, lese-majesty, traitorousness Queen of England for nine days, she was beheaded for treason.
loyalty, allegiance, fidelity, patriotism, faithfulness, fealty
Quotations
"Treason doth never prosper, what's the reason"
"For if it prosper, none dare call it treason" [Sir John Harington Epigrams]

treason

noun
1. Willful violation of allegiance to one's country:
2. Willful betrayal of fidelity, confidence, or trust:
Translations
خِيانَه
velezradavlastizradazrada
højforræderilandsforræderi
hazaárulás
föîurlandssvik, landráî
išdavimas
nodevība
vlastizrada
izdaja
vatana ihanet

treason

[ˈtriːzn] Ntraición f
high treasonalta traición f

treason

[ˈtriːzən] ntrahison f

treason

nVerrat m (→ to an +dat); an act of treasonVerrat m

treason

[ˈtriːzn] ntradimento

treason

(ˈtriːzn) noun
(also high treason) disloyalty to, or betrayal of, one's own country. They were convicted of (high) treason.
References in periodicals archive ?
And while husband-killing could be considered petty treason (a more serious felony), acquittal rates were high: "of the forty-nine cases of husband-killing tried before royal justices in the courts of medieval Yorkshire and Essex, thirty-two women were acquitted, fourteen burned, two hanged, and another convicted (without any indication of the penalty assigned)" (p.
It established offences of high treason, punishable by execution, and the forfeiture of all property to the Crown and of petty treason.