Phaedrus


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Phaedrus

(ˈfiːdrəs)
n
(Biography) ?15 bc–?50 ad, Roman author of five books of Latin verse fables, based chiefly on Aesop
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Phae•drus

(ˈfi drəs, ˈfɛd rəs)

n.
fl. A.D. c40, Roman writer of fables.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Phaedrus, the great imitator of Aesop, plainly indicates this double purpose to be the true office of the writer of fables.
Phaedrus, a slave by birth or by subsequent misfortunes, and admitted by Augustus to the honors of a freedman, imitated many of these fables in Latin iambics about the commencement of the Christian era.
It also contained the Latin versions of the same fables by Phaedrus, Avienus, and other authors.
235; while others make him a contemporary with Phaedrus in the time of Augustus.
Also here, as in the Ion and Phaedrus, Plato appears to acknowledge an unreasoning element in the higher nature of man.
The idealism of Plato is here presented in a less developed form than in the Phaedo and Phaedrus. Nothing is said of the pre-existence of ideas of justice, temperance, and the like.
The doctrines of immortality and pre-existence are carried further in the Phaedrus and Phaedo; the distinction between opinion and knowledge is more fully developed in the Theaetetus.
The Republic, like the Phaedrus, is an imperfect whole; the higher light of philosophy breaks through the regularity of the Hellenic temple, which at last fades away into the heavens.
I have been taught these two aphorisms in Latin and in Greek; one is, I believe, from Phaedrus, and the other from Bias.
Two of his dialogues, the Republic and the Phaedrus disclose these possibilities.
In 'Phaedrus,' arguably the literary high point of Plato's writings, Socrates describes love as a form of 'madness' (manike), which takes hold of immortal souls and becomes the driving force of our lives.
The author took the title and the idea from the nineteenth-century French writer Retif de la Bretonne, intensifying it with elements of Plato's Phaedrus and her own experiences as a Yugoslav student in Greece during the 1970s.