phantasm

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phan·tasm

 (făn′tăz′əm)
n.
1. Something apparently seen but having no physical reality; a phantom or an apparition. Also called phantasma.
2. An illusory mental image. Also called phantasma.
3. In Platonic philosophy, objective reality as perceived and distorted by the five senses.

[Middle English fantasme, from Old French, from Latin phantasma, from Greek, from phantazein, to make visible, from phantos, visible, from phainein, to show; see bhā- in Indo-European roots.]

phan·tas′mal (făn-tăz′məl), phan·tas′mic (-tăz′mĭk) adj.

phantasm

(ˈfæntæzəm)
n
1. a phantom
2. an illusory perception of an object, person, etc
3. (Philosophy) (in the philosophy of Plato) objective reality as distorted by perception
[C13: from Old French fantasme, from Latin phantasma, from Greek; related to Greek phantazein to cause to be seen, from phainein to show]
phanˈtasmal, phantasmalian, phanˈtasmic, phanˈtasmical adj
phanˈtasmally, phanˈtasmically adv

phan•tasm

(ˈfæn tæz əm)

n.
1. an apparition or specter.
2. a creation of the imagination or fancy; fantasy.
3. a mental image or representation of a real object.
4. an illusory likeness of something.
[1175–1225; Middle English fantesme < Old French < Latin phantasma < Greek phántasma image, vision]
phan•tas′mal, phan•tas′mic, phan•tas′mi•cal, adj.

phantasm

a vision or other perception of something that has no physical or objective reality, as a ghost or other supernatural apparition. Also phantasma. See also images; philosophy.
See also: Perception
a vision or other perception of something that has no physical or objective reality, especially in the sense of a ghost or other supernatural apparition. Also phantasma. See also images; philosophy.
See also: Ghosts
the mental image or representation of a real person or thing. See also ghosts; perception.
See also: Images, Philosophy
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phantasm - a ghostly appearing figurephantasm - a ghostly appearing figure; "we were unprepared for the apparition that confronted us"
disembodied spirit, spirit - any incorporeal supernatural being that can become visible (or audible) to human beings
Flying Dutchman - the captain of a phantom ship (the Flying Dutchman) who was condemned to sail against the wind until Judgment Day
2.phantasm - something existing in perception onlyphantasm - something existing in perception only; "a ghostly apparition at midnight"
flying saucer, UFO, unidentified flying object - an (apparently) flying object whose nature is unknown; especially those considered to have extraterrestrial origins
Flying Dutchman - a phantom ship that is said to appear in storms near the Cape of Good Hope
ghost, specter, wraith, spectre, spook, shade - a mental representation of some haunting experience; "he looked like he had seen a ghost"; "it aroused specters from his past"
illusion, semblance - an erroneous mental representation

phantasm

noun
1. A supernatural being, such as a ghost:
Informal: spook.
Regional: haunt.
2. An illusory mental image:
3. An erroneous perception of reality:
Translations

phantasm

[ˈfæntæzəm] Nfantasma m

phantasm

, phantasma
n pl <phantasmata> → Phantasma nt

phan·tasm

n. fantasma, ilusión óptica, aparición.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the contrary: 'Consciousness' consists of consciousness through and through, and the sensation as well as the phantasm is already 'consciousness.'" Ibidem, 323.
The phantasm is uprooting and tormenting Veronica precisely because it has uprooted the larger organization she is a part of.
If the default sense of phantasm is visual, and there is no seeing (no in-sight) into one's intellectual operations (neither any acoustic, tactile, or other sensible phantasm), perhaps the closest image is a kinetic phantasm, that is, the familiar rising through the sequential levels of cognitional structure from experience up through understanding to judgment--the successive progression of cognitional operations as movement through "interior space-time." So we have insight by proxy, by naming the linked set of symbols, which is a verbal solution.