Phidias

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Phid·i·as

 (fĭd′ē-əs) fl. fifth century bc.
Athenian sculptor who supervised work on the Parthenon. His statue of Zeus at Olympia was one of the Seven Wonders of the World.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Phidias

(ˈfɪdɪˌæs)
n
(Biography) 5th century bc, Greek sculptor, regarded as one of the greatest of sculptors. He executed the sculptures of the Parthenon and the colossal statue of Zeus at Olympia, one of the Seven Wonders of the World: neither survives in the original
ˈPhidian adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Phid•i•as

(ˈfɪd i əs)

n.
c500–432? B.C., Greek sculptor.
Phid′i•an, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Phidias - ancient Greek sculptor (circa 500-432 BC)Phidias - ancient Greek sculptor (circa 500-432 BC)
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Translations

Phidias

[ˈfɪdɪæs] nFidia m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
The chosen men of the Athenians were in the van, led by Menestheus son of Peteos, with whom were also Pheidas, Stichius, and stalwart Bias; Meges son of Phyleus, Amphion, and Dracius commanded the Epeans, while Medon and staunch Podarces led the men of Phthia.
(146.) Opponents of the view that women deacons in the Byzantine Church were members of major orders include Vlassios Pheidas, "The Question of the Priesthood of Women," in The Place of the Woman in the Orthodox Church and the Question of the Ordination of Women, ed.
(196.) For example, Pheidas, "The Question of the Priesthood of Women," 181-89.