rose-breasted grosbeak

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rose-breasted grosbeak

n.
A migratory songbird (Pheucticus ludovicianus) of the Americas, the male of which is black and white with a rose-red patch on the breast.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

rose′-breast`ed gros′beak


n.
a North American grosbeak, Pheucticus ludovicianus, the male of which has a rose-pink triangular breast patch.
[1800–10, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of forest management on postfledging survival of Rose-breasted Grosbeaks (Pheucticus ludovicianus).
Other species widely held in early American homes included Baltimore orioles (Icterus galbula), bobolinks (Dolichonyx oryzivorus), rose-breasted grosbeaks (Pheucticus ludovicianus), eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis), indigo buntings (Passerina cyanea), gray catbirds (Dumetella carolinensis), purple finches (Carpodacus purpureus), "black caps" or black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapilla), and red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus).
Bark lice (Liposcelis) were in nests of 11 species, including yellow-billed cuckoos (Coccyzus americanus), eastern phoebes (Sayornis phoebe), blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata), house wrens (Troglodytes aedon), marsh wrens (Telmatodytes palustris), American robins (Turdus migratorius), gray catbirds (Dumetella carolinensis), brown thrashers (Toxostoma rufum), rose-breasted grosbeaks (Pheucticus ludovicianus), common grackles (Quiscalus quiscula), and house sparrows (Passer domesticus).
No significant differences in bird abundance were observed during Trial 2 among the three large-seed varieties with three species being observed >30 times: Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus, N = 61), House Finch (N = 48), and American Goldfinch (N = 197).
cyanea (Linnaeus), indigo I A bunting Pheucticus ludovicianus I C (Linnaeus), rose-breasted grosbeak P.
eight sites in agriculturally dominated landscapes; [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1 OMITTED]) for the American Robin (Turdus migratorius), Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum), Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus), Yellow Warbler (Den~ droica petechia), and Back-headed Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus), the only five open-cup nesting species that were sufficiently abundant in both treatments.