Philip IV


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Philip IV

Known as "Philip the Fair." 1268-1314.
King of France (1285-1314) and of Navarre (1284-1305) as the husband of Joan I of Navarre (c. 1271-1305). His reign was marked by controversy with the papacy and expansion of royal prerogative.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Philip IV

n
(Biography) known as Philip the Fair. 1268–1314, king of France (1285–1314): he challenged the power of the papacy, obtaining the elevation of Clement V as pope residing at Avignon (the beginning of the Babylonian captivity of the papacy)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
In Gascony 'tis no dishonor, sir, nobody is rich; and Henry IV., of glorious memory, who was the king of the Gascons, as His Majesty Philip IV. is the king of the Spaniards, never had a penny in his pocket."
Seoras believes the book will "shatter many of the popular myths" about the life of the folk hero, focusing on his relationships with figures such as Affric ua Bruan, as well as lesser-known periods in his life such as his time fighting for Philip IV of France and his travels in Russia.
Spanish hip-hop musical "La Calderona," staged from June 26 to 30, revolves around Maria Calderon, a 17th century Spanish actress and mistress of Philip IV. "Montand the French Lover" is a French show telling the tale of French singer and actor Yves Montand from the perspective of his sister from June 26 to 30.
Attributed to Michale Stuyck whose legacy is traced ten generations back to the Belgian national Jacobo Vandergotten - with whom in 1721, King Philip IV tasked to create Spain's first carpet factory.
King Philip IV of France wrote to his agents in Rome, commanding them to ask Pope Boniface VIII to view William Wallace favourably.The letter PROVESWALLACE played a role in the turbulent politics of medieval Europe, when the Pope was trying to encourage peace between England and France, and to challenge England's claim to control Scotland."
At dawn on Friday, 13 October 1307 King Philip IV ordered de Molay and scores of other French Templars to be simultaneously arrested.
This collection originates in a conference held at Princeton in 2014 to mark two anniversaries in French history: the famous Battle of Bouvines and the death, a century later, of King Philip IV As William Chester Jordan explains, the intention of the volume's four sections is 'fleshing out' the existing narrative alongside further 'interrogation' of what has been labelled by some the age d'or capetien (pp.
After De Nogaret learned from Gawain (PAaAaAeA draic Delaney) (http://www.tvguide.com/tvshows/knightfall/episode-3-season-1/the-black-wolf-and-the-white-wolf/788462 Season 1, episode 2 that the Pope went all the way to Paris to discuss matters about the long-lost Grail, King Philip IV of France's (Ed Stoppard) right-hand man also tasks his minions to find the Grail before the Templars do.
That agreement largely settled the boundaries between France and Spain, and some 30-odd villages in the Querol Valley were ceded by King Philip IV of Spain to France.
After being given to the Spanish administrator of Panama and taken back to Spain, where it was given to the future Philip II of Spain, the pearl was passed down through a long line of royalty that included Spain's Philip II, Philip III, Philip IV, Charles II, Philip V, Fernando VI, Charles III and Carlos IV.
From the Knights Templar to Dan Brown On Friday October 13th 1307 Philip IV of France arrested hundreds of the Knights Templar.
Goodwin labels as "Gold" the former era of Charles V and Philip II and concentrates here on the imperial and fiscal history of the sixteenth century, envisioned as marking the emergence of the global Spanish monarchy and its rise to become, per the subtitle, the "Centre of the World." The second half of Spain examines what Goodwin styles an age of "Glitter," encompassing the reigns of Philip III, Philip IV, and half that of Charles II.