Philip the Good


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Related to Philip the Good: Philip the Handsome, Philippe le Bon

Philip the Good

n
(Biography) 1396–1467, duke of Burgundy (1419–67), under whose rule Burgundy was one of the most powerful states in Europe

Phil′ip the Good′



n.
1396–1467, duke of Burgundy 1419–67.
References in periodicals archive ?
La Complainte presents a debate between Le Franc's earlier poem, Le Champion des dames, and Le Franc himself, with Le Champion complaining of its frosty reception at the court of Philip the Good in the mid-fifteenth century.
Philip the Good was the ruler of which medieval state?
Gossaert went to Italy in the retinue of this grand and peculiar figure, one of the many illegitimate children of Duke Philip the Good of Burgundy.
This article discusses the mise en prose of Chretien de Troyes's Cliges for the mid-fifteenth-century court of Burgundy under Philip the Good.
He worked as the court painter to Philip the Good of Burgundy, and may have gone on diplomatic assignments in addition to his duties as a painter.
Kelly DeVries observes that the failure of Philip the Good, the rich and powerful late-medieval Duke of Burgundy, to fulfill his vow to go on a Crusade, usually attributed to the death of Pope Nicholas II in 1455, was more likely the result of a suspicion that his nominal ally, the king of France, would attack Burgundy in Philip's absence.
1457 showing Philip the Good at Mass, which includes a group of onlookers who are able to see the duke with both a prayer book and a diptych.
But I think the French excelled themselves when Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, had a son named Charles the Bold.
Commemorating a sumptuously extragavant banquet mounted by Duke Philip the Good of Burgundy at his Lille palace in February 1454, the concert features chansons and dances by the pre-eminent composers of the day, including Binchois, Dufay and van Ghizeghem.
One type of this triumph is illustrated by the entry of Philip the Good into Bruges in 1440 when he was cast in the role of Christ the Savior making a first advent to his sinful people who had earlier rebelled against him (51).