Philistine

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Phil·is·tine

 (fĭl′ĭ-stēn′, fĭ-lĭs′tĭn, -tēn′)
n.
1. A member of a people, perhaps of Aegean origin, who settled ancient Philistia around the 12th century bc.
2. often philistine A person who is smugly indifferent or hostile to art and culture.
adj.
1. Of or relating to ancient Philistia.
2. often philistine Relating to or having the attitudes of a philistine: "our plastic, violent culture, with its philistine tastes and hunger for novelty" (Lloyd Rose).

[From Middle English Philistines, Philistines, from Late Latin Philistīnī, from Greek Philistīnoi, from Hebrew Pəlištîm, from Pəlešet, Philistia.]
Word History: The ultimate origin of the Philistines, the inhabitants of the ancient city-states of Philistia (located in what is now the Gaza Strip and the southern Mediterranean coast of Israel), is not known, although some archaeological evidence links them with ancient peoples of the Aegean region and Anatolia. The English name of this people, the Philistines, ultimately comes from Hebrew Pəlištîm, which is in turn derived from Pəlešet, the Hebrew name for Philistia. In fact, the word Palestine, the more recent historical designation for the entire region between Lebanon and Egypt, also derives from the ancient name of Philistia. Strategically located on a trade route from Egypt to Syria, the cities of Philistia formed a loose confederacy important in biblical times, and the Bible depicts the Philistines as engaged in a struggle with the tribes of Israel for ascendancy in the region. The mighty Israelite warrior Samson, for example, fought with the Philistines on several occasions and was betrayed by his Philistine lover, Delilah. During the 1600s, as a result of the negative depiction of the Philistines in the Bible, the word philistine came to be applied figuratively to anyone considered an enemy. However, the modern sense of the word, "uncultured person," stems from the slang of German university students in the 1600s. Students used Philister, the German equivalent of the English word Philistine, to refer to nonstudents and hence uncultured or materialistic people. At a memorial service in 1693 for a student killed during a town-gown quarrel in Jena, for example, a minister preached a sermon from the text "Philister über dir Simson!" ("The Philistines be upon thee, Samson!")—the words of Delilah to Samson after she attempted to render him powerless before the Philistines. The German usage was eventually picked up in English in the early 1800s.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Philistine

(ˈfɪlɪˌstaɪn)
n
1. a person who is unreceptive to or hostile towards culture, the arts, etc; a smug boorish person
2. (Peoples) a member of the non-Semitic people who inhabited ancient Philistia
adj
3. (sometimes not capital) boorishly uncultured
4. (Peoples) of or relating to the ancient Philistines
Philistinism n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

phil•is•tine

(ˈfɪl əˌstin, -ˌstaɪn, fɪˈlɪs tɪn, -tin)

n.
1. (sometimes cap.) a person who is lacking in or smugly indifferent to culture, aesthetic refinement, etc., or is contentedly commonplace in ideas and tastes.
2. (cap.) a member of a maritime people of Anatolian or Aegean origin who controlled SW Palestine from c1200 to 604 b.c.
adj.
3. (sometimes cap.) lacking in or indifferent to cultural values; uncultivated or smugly conventional.
4. (cap.) of or pertaining to the ancient Philistines.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin Philistīnī (pl.) < Late Greek Philistînoi < Hebrew pəlishtīm; (definition 1) translation of German Philister]
phil′is•tin•ism, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Philistine

A people who were the enemies of the Israelites in their settlement of the Promised Land in the Old Testament.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Philistine - a person who is uninterested in intellectual pursuitsphilistine - a person who is uninterested in intellectual pursuits
pleb, plebeian - one of the common people
2.Philistine - a member of an Aegean people who settled ancient Philistia around the 12th century BC
denizen, dweller, habitant, inhabitant, indweller - a person who inhabits a particular place
Adj.1.Philistine - of or relating to ancient Philistia or its culture or its people
2.philistine - smug and ignorant and indifferent or hostile to artistic and cultural values
nonintellectual - not intellectual
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

philistine

noun
1. boor, barbarian, yahoo, lout, bourgeois, hoon (Austral. & N.Z.), ignoramus, lowbrow, vulgarian The man's a total philistine when it comes to the arts.
adjective
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

Philistine

also philistine
noun
An unrefined, rude person:
adjectivephilistine also Philistine
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
barbarFilištínšosák
spidsborger
filistealainenfilisterimoukkamoukkamainen
filiszterfiliszteus
filisterfilisterskiFilistynfilistyński

Philistine

[ˈfɪlɪstaɪn]
A. ADJ
1. (lit) → filisteo
2. (fig) → inculto
B. N
1. (lit) → filisteo/a m/f
2. (fig) → inculto/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

philistine

[ˈfɪlɪstaɪn]
nphilistin m
adj [person, organization] → philistin adj m, de philistins
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

philistine

adj (fig)kulturlos, philisterhaft (geh); tell that philistine friend of yours …sag deinem Freund, diesem Banausen
n
(lit) PhilistinePhilister(in) m(f)
(fig)Banause m, → Banausin f, → Philister(in) m(f) (geh)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Philistine

[ˈfɪlɪˌstaɪn] adjfilisteo/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
"They have given the signal at last!" cried the Pharisee "they have given the signal at last!pull away, Abel-Phittim!-and thou, Buzi-Ben-Levi, pull away!-for verily the Philistines have either still hold upon the basket, or the Lord hath softened their hearts to place therein a beast of good weight!" And the Gizbarim pulled away, while their burden swung heavily upward through the still increasing mist.
While this "True" Socialism thus served the governments as a weapon for fighting the German bourgeoisie, it, at the same time, directly represented a reactionary interest, the interest of the German Philistines. In Germany the petty-bourgeois class, a relic of the sixteenth century, and since then constantly cropping up again under various forms, is the real social basis of the existing state of things.
In fact, placed before the strict and piercing truth, this whole story will fare like that fish, flesh, and fowl idol of the Philistines, Dagon by name; who being planted before the ark of Israel, his horse's head and both the palms of his hands fell off from him, and only the stump or fishy part of him remained.
For them he borrows from German criticism the name 'Philistines,' enemies of the chosen people, and he finds their prevailing traits to be intellectual and spiritual narrowness and a fatal and superficial satisfaction with mere activity and material prosperity.
When Epstein, the agent, wrote to say that the allegory had been purchased by a Glasgow plutocrat of the name of Bates for one hundred and sixty guineas, Sellers' views on Philistines and their crass materialism and lack of taste underwent a marked modification.
de Treville felt himself something like Samson before the Philistines.
David offered himself to Saul to fight with Goliath, the Philistine champion, and, to give him courage, Saul armed him with his own weapons; which David rejected as soon as he had them on his back, saying he could make no use of them, and that he wished to meet the enemy with his sling and his knife.
It is their serious fidelity which gives them a value unique in literature, and which if it were carefully analyzed would afford a principle of the same quality in an author who was undoubtedly one of the finest of artists as well as the most Philistine of men.
see, he is again about to go up to battle against the Philistine Pray, child pray for the safety of the good youth, and of the speedy horse, and the rich armour.
Do tell, now, cried Bildad, is this Philistine a regular member of Deacon Deuteronomy's meeting?
Watson talked all the time of things he did not care about, and while he looked upon Watson as a Philistine he could not help admiring him.
A sharp and clever remark, usually quoted, and seldom noted; what the Philistine is pleased to call a "joke."