Aristotle

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Ar·is·tot·le

 (ăr′ĭ-stŏt′l) 384-322 bc.
Greek philosopher. A pupil of Plato, the tutor of Alexander the Great, and the author of works on logic, metaphysics, ethics, natural sciences, politics, and poetics, he profoundly influenced Western thought. In his philosophical system, which led him to criticize what he saw as Plato's metaphysical excesses, theory follows empirical observation and logic, based on the syllogism, is the essential method of rational inquiry.

aristotle

(ˈærɪˌstɒtəl)
n
1. a bottle
2. old-fashioned the buttocks or anus
[rhyming slang; in sense 2, shortened from bottle and glass arse]

Aristotle

(ˈærɪˌstɒtəl)
n
(Biography) 384–322 bc, Greek philosopher; pupil of Plato, tutor of Alexander the Great, and founder of the Peripatetic school at Athens; author of works on logic, ethics, politics, poetics, rhetoric, biology, zoology, and metaphysics. His works influenced Muslim philosophy and science and medieval scholastic philosophy

Aristotle

(ˈærɪˌstɒtəl)
n
(Celestial Objects) a prominent crater in the NW quadrant of the moon about 83 kilometres in diameter

Ar•is•tot•le

(ˈær əˌstɒt l)

n.
384–322 B.C., Greek philosopher: pupil of Plato; tutor of Alexander the Great.

Ar·is·tot·le

(ăr′ĭ-stŏt′l)
384-322 b.c. Greek philosopher and scientist who profoundly influenced Western thought. Aristotle wrote about virtually every area of knowledge, including most of the sciences. Throughout his life he made careful observations, collected specimens, and summarized all the existing knowledge of the natural world. He pioneered the study of zoology, developing a classification system for all animals and making extensive taxonomic studies. His systematic approach later evolved into the basic scientific method in the Western world.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aristotle - one of the greatest of the ancient Athenian philosophersAristotle - one of the greatest of the ancient Athenian philosophers; pupil of Plato; teacher of Alexander the Great (384-322 BC)
entelechy - (Aristotle) the state of something that is fully realized; actuality as opposed to potentiality
Translations
AristotelesAristotelés
Aristoteles
Aristoteles
Arystoteles

Aristotle

[ˈærɪstɒtl] NAristóteles

Aristotle

nAristoteles m

Aristotle

[ˈærɪˌstɒtl] nAristotele m
References in classic literature ?
Wallace, Outlines of the Philosophy of Aristotle, 1875, 1880; A.
That said, one does not have to agree with Collin McGinn to appreciate his often refreshing discussion of the perennial issues, although his avoidance of the perennial philosophy of Aristotle can be annoying to anyone steeped in the history of philosophy.--Jude P.
Author and translator Sami Aydin presents readers with a comprehensive examination of the Syriac writings of physician and commentator of Sergius of Reshaina on the philosophy of Aristotle. The author covers Sergius as a writer and his original works, SergiusAEs educational background, Sergius as a commentator on the works of Aristotle, and a wide variety of other related subjects over the course of the bookAEs eight chapters.
Most of all, the youth apply the highest form of argument using the philosophy of Aristotle, which has always been proven right-the very reason philosophies before the birth of Jesus Christ continue to fare well in this day and age.
For academicians and non-specialist general reader with an interest in the philosophy of Aristotle, it should be noted that "Mortal Imitations of Divine Life" is also available in a paperback edition (9780810131781, $39.95) and in a Kindle format ($37.95).

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