common sense

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common sense

n.
Sound judgment not based on specialized knowledge.

[Translation of Latin sēnsus commūnis, common feelings of humanity.]

com′mon-sense′ (kŏm′ən-sĕns′), com′mon·sen′si·cal (-sĕn′sĭ-kəl) adj.

common sense

n
plain ordinary good judgment; sound practical sense
adj
inspired by or displaying sound practical sense

com′mon sense′


n.
sound practical judgment independent of specialized knowledge or training; normal native intelligence.
[1525–35; translation of Latin sēnsus commūnis]
com′mon•sense′, adj.
com′mon•sen′si•cal, com′mon•sen′si•ble, adj.
com′mon•sen′si•cal•ly, com′mon•sen′si•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.common sense - sound practical judgment; "Common sense is not so common"; "he hasn't got the sense God gave little green apples"; "fortunately she had the good sense to run away"
sagaciousness, sagacity, discernment, judgement, judgment - the mental ability to understand and discriminate between relations
logic - reasoned and reasonable judgment; "it made a certain kind of logic"
nous - common sense; "she has great social nous"
road sense - good judgment in avoiding trouble or accidents on the road

common sense

noun good sense, sound judgment, level-headedness, practicality, prudence, nous (Brit. slang), soundness, reasonableness, gumption (Brit. informal), horse sense, native intelligence, mother wit, smarts (slang, chiefly U.S.), wit Her mother acted with remarkable common sense.

common sense

noun
The ability to make sensible decisions:
Informal: gumption, horse sense.
Translations
إدْراك سَليم، إحْساس فِطْري صَحيحمَنْطِقٌ سَلِيم
zdravý rozum
omtankesund fornuft
terve järki
היגיון פשוטשכל הישר
zdrav razum
józan ész
almenn skynsemiheilbrigî skynsemi
常識
상식
zdrav razum
förnuftsunt förnuft
สามัญสำนึก
thường thức

common sense

nbuon senso

common

(ˈkomən) adjective
1. seen or happening often; quite normal or usual. a common occurrence; These birds are not so common nowadays.
2. belonging equally to, or shared by, more than one. This knowledge is common to all of us; We share a common language.
3. publicly owned. common property.
4. coarse or impolite. She uses some very common expressions.
5. of ordinary, not high, social rank. the common people.
6. of a noun, not beginning with a capital letter (except at the beginning of a sentence). The house is empty.
noun
(a piece of) public land for everyone to use, with few or no buildings. the village common.
ˈcommoner noun
a person who is not of high rank. The royal princess married a commoner.
common knowledge
something known to everyone or to most people. Surely you know that already – it's common knowledge.
common ˈlaw noun
a system of unwritten laws based on old customs and on judges' earlier decisions.
ˈcommon-law adjective
referring to a relationship between two people who are not officially married, but have the same rights as husband and wife. a common-law marriage; a common-law wife/husband.
ˈcommonplace adjective
very ordinary and uninteresting. commonplace remarks.
ˈcommon-room noun
in a college, school etc a sitting-room for the use of a group.
common sense
practical good sense. If he has any common sense he'll change jobs.
the Common Market
(formerly) an association of certain European countries to establish free trade (without duty, tariffs etc) among them, now replaced by the European Union.
the (House of) Commons
the lower house of the British parliament.
in common
(of interests, attitudes, characteristics etc) shared or alike. They have nothing in common – I don't know why they're getting married.

common sense

مَنْطِقٌ سَلِيم zdravý rozum sund fornuft gesunder Menschenverstand κοινή λογική sentido común terve järki bon sens zdrav razum buonsenso 常識 상식 gezond verstand sunn fornuft zdrowy rozsądek bom senso здравый смысл förnuft สามัญสำนึก sağduyu thường thức 常识
References in periodicals archive ?
Reid's philosophy of common sense may not be the answer to many philosophical questions, as pointed out by many of his critics, but this should not dissuade us from taking the liberty of picking up some of his concepts and intellectual constructs and applying them to the field of communication.
Budge has recently edited a collection on the Common Sense tradition's Romantic reception (Romantic Empiricism: Poetics and the Philosophy of Common Sense, 1780-1830 [Bucknell, 2007]), and his continued investment in recognizing this lineage shows in the current study.
America and the Political Philosophy of Common Sense.

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