phishing

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Related to Phisher: identity theft, fissure

phishing

a scam of sending e-mails from a fake Web site to illegally obtain password information

phish

 (fĭsh)
intr.v. phished, phish·ing, phish·es
To request confidential information over the internet or by telephone under false pretenses in order to fraudulently obtain credit card numbers, passwords, or other personal data.

[Alteration (influenced by phreak) of fish.]

phishing

(ˈfɪʃɪŋ)
n
(Telecommunications) the practice of using fraudulent e-mails and copies of legitimate websites to extract financial data from computer users for purposes of identity theft
[C21: from fishing in the sense of catching the unwary by offering bait; computer-hacker slang often replaces f with ph]

phishing

A method of committing fraud by sending emails to the customers of a legitimate online business, such as a bank, that pretend to be from that business and ask for information such as account numbers or passwords.
Translations

phishing

[ˈfɪʃɪŋ] N (Internet) → phishing m

phishing

n (Internet) → Phishing nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Sometimes, a phisher will direct you to a real company's, organisation's, or agency's website, but then an unauthorised pop-up screen created by the scammer appears out of the blue, with blanks in which to provide your personal information.
"Urgency is the phisher's best friend," said Jeremy Richards, principal security researcher at the cybersecurity company Lookout of San Francisco.
A spokesman for the North West Regional Organised Crime Unit said: "The phisher is gambling that enough people will respond so that their scam is profitable.
This is because the phisher can simply clone the website with some modifications in the input tag to collect personal information.
* An email pretending to be from Facebook, asking you to click a link to see a photo that a family member posted of you (the phisher may even use the family member's name for an added sheen of legitimacy)
By compromising a web server, a phisher has access to all hosts on that server.
The information obtained by the attacker (referred to as the phisher) is used to take control of the customer's account, steal the individual's sensitive information, or is sold on the underground market [1].
In another email, a phisher wrote, "Can you send me the updated list of employees with full details (Name, Social Security Number, Date of Birth, Home Address, Salary) as of 2/2/2016."
A phisher will typically email employees at a particular company, purporting to be from a legitimate source and asking for information.
And as the miscreant phisher makes a lunge for your
Another Internet security firm Symantec said in its recent report on 2010 threats, URL shortening services will become Aaethe phisher s best friendAAE.
When XPRESS took the bait, the phisher sent pictures purportedly of the flat advertised.