phlegm

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Related to Phlegma: phlegmatic, phlegmon

phlegm

 (flĕm)
n.
1. Thick, sticky, stringy mucus secreted by the mucous membrane of the respiratory tract, as during a cold or other respiratory infection.
2. One of the four humors of ancient and medieval physiology, thought to cause sluggishness, apathy, and evenness of temper.
3. Sluggishness of temperament.
4. Calm self-possession; equanimity.

[Middle English fleume, mucous discharge, the humor phlegm, from Old French, from Medieval Latin phlegma, flegma, from Late Latin phlegma, the humor phlegm, from Greek, heat, the humor phlegm, from phlegein, to burn.]

phlegm′y adj.

phlegm

(flɛm)
n
1. (Physiology) the viscid mucus secreted by the walls of the respiratory tract
2. (Physiology) archaic one of the four bodily humours
3. apathy; stolidity; indifference
4. self-possession; imperturbability; coolness
[C14: from Old French fleume, from Late Latin phlegma, from Greek: inflammation, from phlegein to burn]
ˈphlegmy adj

phlegm

(flɛm)

n.
1. the thick mucus secreted in the respiratory passages and discharged through the mouth, esp. that occurring in the lungs and throat passages, as during a cold.
2. one of the four elemental bodily humors of medieval physiology, regarded as causing sluggishness or apathy.
3. sluggishness or apathy.
4. calmness; composure.
[1350–1400; Middle English fleem < Middle French flemme < Late Latin phlegma < Greek phlégma flame, phlegmatic humor =phlég(ein) to burn + -ma resultative n. suffix]
phlegm′y, adj. phlegm•i•er, phlegm•i•est.

phlegm

(flĕm)
Mucus produced by the mucous membranes of the respiratory tract.

phlegm

- Comes from Latin phlegma, "clammy moisture," and Greek phlegma, "inflammation."
See also related terms for inflammation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phlegm - apathy demonstrated by an absence of emotional reactionsphlegm - apathy demonstrated by an absence of emotional reactions
apathy - an absence of emotion or enthusiasm
2.phlegm - expectorated matter; saliva mixed with discharges from the respiratory passages; in ancient and medieval physiology it was believed to cause sluggishness
mucous secretion, mucus - protective secretion of the mucus membranes; in the gut it lubricates the passage of food and protects the epithelial cells; in the nose and throat and lungs it can make it difficult for bacteria to penetrate the body through the epithelium
3.phlegm - inactivityphlegm - inactivity; showing an unusual lack of energy; "the general appearance of sluggishness alarmed his friends"
inertia, inactiveness, inactivity - a disposition to remain inactive or inert; "he had to overcome his inertia and get back to work"

phlegm

noun
1. mucus, catarrh, sputum, mucous secretion Symptoms include vomiting and excess phlegm.
2. self-control, composure, coolness, cool (informal), calm, coldness, calmness, equanimity, self-assurance, self-possession, sangfroid, frostiness, level-headedness, unflappability (informal), stolidness They're taking it with the apathetic calm which many mistake for British phlegm.

phlegm

noun
Translations
بَلْغَم
hlen
slim
slejm
kvefslím
flegmatiškasskrepliai
krēpas

phlegm

[flem] N
1. (Med) (= mucus) → flema f
2. (= equanimity) → flema f

phlegm

[ˈflɛm] n (= mucus) → flegme m

phlegm

n (= mucus)Schleim m; (obs: = humour) → Phlegma nt; (fig) (= coolness)Gemütsruhe f, → stoische Ruhe; (= stolidness)Trägheit f, → Schwerfälligkeit f, → Phlegma nt

phlegm

[flɛm] nflemma

phlegm

(flem) noun
thick, slimy liquid brought up from the throat by coughing.
phlegmatic (flegˈmatik) adjective
calm; not easily excited. She's very phlegmatic – nothing would ever make her panic.

phlegm

n. flema.
mucus;
uno de los cuatro humores del cuerpo.

phlegm

n flema (frec. pl)
References in periodicals archive ?
Take away the recipient, And rectify your menstrue from the phlegma.
Galen in second century AD in his humoral concept of disease attributed abnormalities of yellow bile, black bile, blood and phlegma within the body to cause disease.
al respecto, el libro IV de las Etimologias de Isidoro de Sevilla, que en el capitulo 5, tras explicar la etimologia de los terminos sanguis, cholera, melancholia y phlegma, afirma lo siguiente (Etym.