earless seal

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earless seal

n.
Any of various seals of the family Phocidae, which includes the harbor seal and elephant seals, characterized by short fore flippers, hind flippers specialized for swimming, a coat of short sleek hair, and the absence of external ears. Also called phocid, true seal.

earless seal

n
(Animals) any seal of the pinniped family Phocidae, typically having rudimentary hind limbs, no external earflaps, and a body covering of hair with no underfur. Also called: hair seal Compare eared seal

ear′less seal′


n.
any seal of the family Phocidae, lacking external ears and using the hind flippers only for swimming.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.earless seal - any of several seals lacking external ear flaps and having a stiff hairlike coat with hind limbs reduced to swimming flippersearless seal - any of several seals lacking external ear flaps and having a stiff hairlike coat with hind limbs reduced to swimming flippers
seal - any of numerous marine mammals that come on shore to breed; chiefly of cold regions
family Phocidae, Phocidae - earless seals
common seal, harbor seal, Phoca vitulina - small spotted seal of coastal waters of the northern hemisphere
harp seal, Pagophilus groenlandicus - common Arctic seal; the young are all white
elephant seal, sea elephant - either of two large northern Atlantic earless seals having snouts like trunks
bearded seal, Erignathus barbatus, squareflipper square flipper - medium-sized greyish to yellow seal with bristles each side of muzzle; of the Arctic Ocean
bladdernose, Cystophora cristata, hooded seal - medium-sized blackish-grey seal with large inflatable sac on the head; of Arctic and northern Atlantic waters
Translations
tuleň
varsinaiset hylkeet
References in periodicals archive ?
Examples of this bias are species of commercial interest and iconic or flagship species, preferred for their heavy body weight (e.g., mysticetes, proboscideans, large cats, etc.) or positive public perception (e.g., odontocetes, primates, phocids, Cardoso et al., 2011b).
The fossil record suggests that the sea lions and walruses have a putative origin on the northern Pacific coast, while the phocids originated on the southeastern coast of North America and then dispersed into polar regions (Arnason et al., 2006).
Genetically identified stomach contents have included cetaceans and phocids; however, a histological analysis of ingested tissue indicated scavenging rather than live captures in the case of all cetacean and some phocid samples, and the evidence was inconclusive for some freshly ingested phocid tissue (Sigler et al., 2006).
Lawrence and Newfoundland, the Canadian government invokes the principle of free (human) choice to justify an annual harvest now set at a quota of 325,000 non-human phocids. "It is up to the fishermen to make the decision whether it is worthwhile to hunt," explained Steve Outhouse, a spokesman for Canada's Department of Fisheries and Oceans.
Monk-seals, phocids in the tropics that should not exist, "balanced on an evolutionary knife edge," are Cayaba seals, Monarchus manachus, Mediterranean monk seals that mysteriously appear in Caribbean waters (as witnessed in The New Moon's Arms 111-112).
The editors and authors have made a serious (and successful) effort to contrast the results of research on elephant seals with other phocids, and where appropriate, other vertebrates.
Family Phocidae: although seal (phocids) records are rare in the study area, petroglyphs found in Easter Island indicate that an unidentified seal (termed pakia in Rapa Nui) was an occasional visitor in prehistoric times.
Ringed seals are arguably the most ice-obligate of all Arctic phocids. From January through March, their calls were significantly more likely to be detected when the ice cover was at or near 100%.
RISKMAN differs from other simulation models in providing the option to model the specific population dynamics of species with multiyear reproductive schedules, such as bears, cetaceans, elephants, phocids, and primates (Taylor et al., 1987b), although RISKMAN can also model simple annual reproduction.