Phomvihane


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Phomvihane

(ˈpɒmvɪhɑːn)
n
(Biography) Kaysone (ˈkaɪsɒn). 1920–92, Laotian Communist statesman; prime minister of Laos (1975–91); president (1991–92)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Vanxay Sayavong is Researcher at the Centre of Macroeconomic Policy and Fxonomic Restructuring (CMER), National Institute for Economic Research (NIER) - Kaysone Phomvihane Street, Km 5, Sivilay Village, Saythany District, Vientiane Capital, Lao PDR; email: sai_vanxay48@yahoo.com
(14) Lao Prime Minister Kaysone Phomvihane, who served from 1975 to 1991, accused the United States of supporting anti-LPDR groups both inside and outside the country, and further claimed that they represented "the gravest threat to national independence, peace and stability".
Hun Sen has stated that he has taken late Lao prime minister Kaysone Phomvihane's way of national reconciliation following the 1975 revolution as a model for the recreation of the Cambodian monarchy, in terms of how Kaysone's new regime dealt with the Lao monarchy that it replaced.
The cave where the late secretary general Kaysone Phomvihane (1920-92) established a secret party base during the "American War" (1964-73) is nowadays the key exhibit of the increasingly popular Viengxay Caves Tour.
Xaysomphone Phomvihane, Minister of Finance, acknowledges that the only way for a country which depends on its coffee industry as an important source of revenue to survive is by ensuring quality.
Somsay Ouanphilalay is Inclusiveness Consultant, LBF Secretariat, Lao National Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Kaysone Phomvihane Avenue, Phonphanao Village, Xaysettha District, Vientiane Capital, Lao PDR; email: somsay.ouanphilalay@gmail.com
At the Third Congress of the LPRP in 1982, the then party general-secretary, Kaysone Phomvihane, reiterated the need for the country to move from a subsistence-based to an industrialised socialist economy, marking the beginning of development planning in the country.
(Phetsarath's choice of a Thai wife of course, provides an interesting contrast with the number of top Pathet Lao leaders--notably Souphanouvong, Kaysone Phomvihane and Nouhak Phoumsavan--who married Vietnamese women.) As a result, Phetsarath continues to roam the edges of official historiography in Laos and in Vietnam.