phoneme

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Related to Phonemes: Allophones

pho·neme

 (fō′nēm′)
n.
The smallest phonetic unit in a language that is capable of conveying a distinction in meaning, as the m of mat and the b of bat in English.

[French phonème, from Greek phōnēma, phōnēmat-, utterance, sound produced, from phōnein, to produce a sound, from phōnē, sound, voice; see bhā- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

phoneme

(ˈfəʊniːm)
n
(Linguistics) linguistics one of the set of speech sounds in any given language that serve to distinguish one word from another. A phoneme may consist of several phonetically distinct articulations, which are regarded as identical by native speakers, since one articulation may be substituted for another without any change of meaning. Thus /p/ and /b/ are separate phonemes in English because they distinguish such words as pet and bet, whereas the light and dark /l/ sounds in little are not separate phonemes since they may be transposed without changing meaning
[C20: via French from Greek phōnēma sound, speech]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pho•neme

(ˈfoʊ nim)

n.
any of the minimal units of speech sound in a language that can serve to distinguish one word from another: The (p) of pit and the (b) of bit are considered two different phonemes, while the unaspirated (p) of spin and the aspirated (p) of pin are not. Compare allophone.
[1890–95; < French phonème < Greek phṓnēma sound <phōneîn to make a sound (derivative of phonḗ sound, voice)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

phoneme

- A word for a hallucination in which voices are heard.
See also related terms for heard.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

phoneme

Any of the speech sounds in a language that convey a difference in meaning.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phoneme - (linguistics) one of a small set of speech sounds that are distinguished by the speakers of a particular language
linguistics - the scientific study of language
speech sound, phone, sound - (phonetics) an individual sound unit of speech without concern as to whether or not it is a phoneme of some language
allophone - (linguistics) any of various acoustically different forms of the same phoneme
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
häälik
foneemi
fonem
fonéma
foneem
fonem

phoneme

[ˈfəʊniːm] Nfonema m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

phoneme

[ˈfəʊniːm] nphonème mphone number nnuméro m de téléphonephone tap nécoute f téléphonique
He assured them that ministers were not subjected to phone taps → Il leur a assuré que les ministres n'étaient pas placés sous écoute téléphonique.phone tapping nécoutes fpl téléphoniques
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

phoneme

nPhonem nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

phoneme

[ˈfəʊniːm] n (Ling) → fonema m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The Allophonic Theory, in turn, postulates that the phonological change presented by dyslexic individuals would be caused by a deficit in the speech perception, characterized by an allophonic mode of perception, where there is insensitivity to the perception of phonemes. To the Auditory Deficit Theory changes on speech perception would be secondary to a more elementary alteration in the processing of acoustic stimuli.
Two sounds must also exhibit phonetic similarity in order to be considered allophones of the same phoneme. Thus, English [h] and [[??]], which never occur in the same environment, are nevertheless separate phonemes, even though no minimal pairs can be found, because they lack phonetic similarity, qv.
The second paper entitled Deficiencies in the Performance of Arab Phonemes in Heritage: Causes and Means of Developing Phonemic Awareness and Language Delay of Kindergarten and 1stGrade Pupils of Basic Education, will be presented by Prof.
At their inherently linguistic level, speech sounds are represented as phonemes. The nature of phonemes is to be understood through an understanding of the underlying nature of features.
To train phoneme recognition systems we must have speech databases with their respective phonemes adequately segmented and validated, which requires costly and intensive processes in skilled labor.
The sign gesture is the union the sign phonemes. The sign phonemes (manual and non-manual features) are the basic units of the sign gestures.
HMM technology involves making some assumptions, such as which phonemes to use in the modeling.
Phonological awareness has been defined as consciously knowing that words have several constituent units of sound (Gillam & van Kleecl, 1996), and being able to reflect on and manipulate the subunits of speech: syllables, intrasyllabic units, and phonemes (Anthony et al., 2011; Morais, 1991; Treiman, 1991).
Other students from the URLearning project school engage with Russian (a Slavic language with unpredictable vowel patterns), Korean (a character-based language made up of 19 consonant and 21 vowel phonemes), and Myanmar (a circular letter alphabet made up of 33 letters and 12 vowels) or come from nation states with multiple official languages of varying histories, such as those found in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Afghanistan.
Another study, published this year by Marc Slutzky at Northwestern University, made an attempt to decode signals from the motor cortex as patients read aloud words containing all of the 39 English phonemes (consonant and vowel sounds).
It has been long believed that dyslexia is a result of an inability of the brain to learn all the small sound units or "phonemes" used to build up words, but the new study suggested that the real problem lies in one part of the brain not being able to link up with another, the Independent reported.
In addition, 27 phonemes sometimes pronounced like sez in different accents or in slurred talk give a shonky total of 55 spellings.