working memory

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working memory

n.
1. A portion of digital memory reserved for data to be temporarily stored during the running of a program. Also called working storage.
2. The part of the mind that stores and manipulates information in the short term and is responsible for planning and carrying out behavior.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

working memory

n
(Psychology) psychol the current contents of a person's consciousness
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.working memory - memory for intermediate results that must be held during thinking
remembering, memory - the cognitive processes whereby past experience is remembered; "he can do it from memory"; "he enjoyed remembering his father"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This phenomenon is known as phonological similarity effect (PSE; Baddeley 1966; Conrad and Hull 1964).
Reversing the phonological similarity effect. Memory & Cognition, 27, 45-53.
In the section that follows, I discuss the phonological similarity effect (neighborhood density) that has been used in English and Spanish to test its influence on language storage and retrieval.
By controlling frequency of occurrence, phonological similarity effects can be examined to see if they differentially affect processing of regular and irregular verbal morphology.
The two that are of interest here are the phonological similarity effect and the word length effect.
This is the so-called phonological similarity effect. The pattern of this effect indicates the importance of the role played by phonological coding in short-term memory.
If individuals use a phonological representation for forward and backward recall, then recall performance on both recall tasks should show a phonological similarity effect. That is, we should find fewer letters recalled from the phonologically similar strings of letters, independent of direction of recall.
(1984) demonstrated that the word length effect (short words being recalled better than long words) was abolished by concurrent articulation during encoding and recall, whereas the phonological similarity effect (lists of different-sounding words being recalled better than lists of similar-sounding words) remained intact.