Phony war


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Related to Phony war: sitzkrieg

phony war

n
1. (in wartime) a period of apparent calm and inactivity, esp the period at the beginning of World War II
2. (in peacetime) a contrived embattled atmosphere; mock war
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Phony war

The period from September 1939 to April 1940 during which Britain was officially at war with Germany but no actual fighting took place.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
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He sees a phony war that came out of a phony victory, producing an unsatisfactory, uncomfortable, unhappy peace, and the self-flattering fantasy that Britain won the war and the common belief that they did so more or less alone.
That period was known as the Phony War, because nothing seemed to be happening in Britain.
Summary: The quiet period between the declaration of war in September 1939 and the Nazi blitz against Belgium and France in May 1940 is often referred to as "The Phony War."
This one act alone put an end to the "phony war" - over the next four weeks some 350,000 members of the British Expeditionary Force were living a life in hell.
I hope everyone who is against this phony war will speak up and write Stephen Harper.
British Strategy and Politics During the Phony War: Before the Balloon Went Up.
The Nazi conquest of Poland had settled into "the phony war," with neither side doing much of anything.
You know that this is a phony war because Saddam Hussein has no connection with the horrors of September 11 and is actually antagonistic to al Qaida.
This period was known as the "phony war," even though terrible events were taking place in Poland.
To upstage and camouflage a real war at home the threat of terror is being employed to justify a phony war in Afghanistan.
But once again there was a lull, a kind of phony war. The President's words before the joint session of Congress were clear enough.