photodegradable

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Related to Photodegradation: Photocatalysis

pho·to·de·grad·a·ble

 (fō′tō-dĭ-grā′də-bəl)
adj.
Capable of being chemically broken down by light: photodegradable plastic.

photodegradable

(ˌfəʊtəʊdɪˈɡreɪdəbəl)
adj
(Environmental Science) (of plastic) capable of being decomposed by prolonged exposure to light

pho•to•de•grad•a•ble

(ˌfoʊ toʊ dɪˈgreɪ də bəl)

adj.
(of a substance) capable of being broken down by light.
[1970–75]

pho·to·de·grad·a·ble

(fō′tō-dĭ-grā′də-bəl)
Capable of being chemically decomposed by light. For example, photodegradable plastic becomes brittle and breaks into smaller pieces when exposed to sunlight, helping reduce litter and environmental damage.
References in periodicals archive ?
To prevent the photodegradation of plastics, UV absorbers are used in combination with HALS.
However, an increase in oxygen content and as a result increase in O/C ratio is also used as a tool for determining extent of photodegradation in an epoxy coating due to weathering.
Kinetics of photodegradation and nanoparticle surface accumulation of a nanosilica/epoxy coating expose to U V light--Hsiang-Chun Hsueh, Deborah S.
The application of this treatment process was more favourable in the photodegradation of DDT compared to lindane which resulted 73-87% and 36-68% of removal respectively.
The photodegradation experiments were conducted in a glass batch photoreactor with dimensions 40 x 25 x 7 cm (length x width x depth), as images shown in Figure 1, using artificial UV irradiation provided by germicide lamp (OSRAM 15 W).
Also, they have noticed by using FTIR analysis that photodegradation generated carbonyl groups by chain scission and the rate was slightly higher for the nanocomposites than for the neat epoxy.
The percentage photodegradation efficiency ([eta]) was calculated from the following expression:
Tanguay, JF, Suib, SL, Coughlin, RW, "Dichloromethane Photodegradation Using Titanium Catalysts.
As shown in Figure 7(b), the photodegradation of MO obeys pseudo-first-order kinetics.
Through photodegradation and other weathering processes, plastics undergo fragmentation in the ocean and converge with subtropical gyres.