Phrygian cap


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Phrygian cap

Phrygian cap

n
(Clothing & Fashion) a conical cap of soft material worn during ancient times that became a symbol of liberty during the French Revolution
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He wore a red woolen bonnet, exactly like the Phrygian cap in which Liberty is tricked out, a piece of head-gear in common use in this country.
Protruding from the armor is an unsheathed sword topped by a Phrygian cap, which is a brimless, limp stocking cap originally worn in the 12th century BC by some people in what is now Turkey and often seen today on garden gnomes.
A folded fundus, the Phrygian cap, is the most common congenital anomaly of the GB.
Refinery29 reported that throughout French history, Marianne has often appeared with her head covered in a Phrygian cap and her breasts were not always displayed.
Intraoperatively on cholangiography, 17 patients were found to have normal anatomy of hepatobiliary system, whereas 2 patients had accessory cystic artery and 1 patient was found to have phrygian cap and no one had unsuspected common duct stones (Table 5).
In one relief on the railing that wraps around Stupa 2 at the same site, a rampant lion is shown resisting the attack of a warrior dressed in a Phrygian cap, a cuirass, and boots.
The Phrygian cap became a symbol of liberty during which revolution?
Examples include the Phrygian cap of the French Revolution, the Iwo Jima flag photograph of World War If, the hammer and sickle of the Soviet Union, and, most recently, the iconic multi-tone "Hope" poster of Barack Obama.
They were made of bronze and resembled the Phrygian cap, characterized by its conical shape and forward-leaning peak.
The differential diagnosis of a GB duplication seen in US is large, but the most common diagnosis are a Phrygian cap, gallbladder diverticulum or a choledochal cyst.(3) Once the diagnosis has been made by seen two cystic ducts in the symptomatic patient, the surgical removal of both gallbladders is indicated.
Augustine even records that one devotee of Cybele, attempting to defend himself from hostile Christians, declared "the one in the Phrygian cap [Attis] is also a Christian" (Vermaseren, p.