psychology

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psy·chol·o·gy

(sī-kŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. psy·chol·o·gies
1. The science that deals with mental processes and behavior.
2. The emotional and behavioral characteristics of an individual, a group, or those engaged in a given activity: the psychology of war.
3. Subtle tactical action or argument used to manipulate or influence another: He used poor psychology on his employer when trying to make the point.
4. Philosophy The branch of metaphysics that studies the soul, the mind, and the relationship of life and mind to the functions of the body.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

psychology

(saɪˈkɒlədʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. (Psychology) the scientific study of all forms of human and animal behaviour, sometimes concerned with the methods through which behaviour can be modified. See also analytical psychology, clinical psychology, comparative psychology, educational psychology, experimental psychology
2. (Psychology) informal the mental make-up or structure of an individual that causes him or her to think or act in the way he or she does
psyˈchologist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

psy•chol•o•gy

(saɪˈkɒl ə dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
1. the science of the mind or of mental states and processes.
2. the science of human and animal behavior.
3. the sum of the mental states and processes characteristic of a person or class of persons.
4. mental ploys or strategy: He used psychology to get a promotion.
[1675–85; < New Latin psȳchologia]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

psy·chol·o·gy

(sī-kŏl′ə-jē)
The scientific study of mental processes and behavior.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Psychology


the study or treatment of mental diseases, especially in their relation to legal problems. — alienist, n.
the simultaneous presence in one person of positive and negative feelings towards a person, object, etc.; coexistence of mixed feelings.
the projection of one’s own characteristics onto another person. — automorphic, adj.
the theory or doctrine that observed behavior provides the only valid data of psychology. — behaviorist, n., adj. — behavioristic, adj.
the state of being sexually responsive or attracted to members of both sexes. See also body, human. — bisexual, adj.
Gestalt Psychology. the basic precept that psychological phenomena are the result of gestalts functioning separately or in relation to one another, as contrasted with individual elements, such as reflexes or sensations. — configurationist, n., — configurational, configurative, adj.
Medicine. a frenzied, sleepless delirium accompanied by wild and frightening hallucinations. Also corybantiasm.
a method of self-help stressing autosuggestion, introduced into America by the French psychotherapist Emile Coué c. 1920 and featuring the slogan “Every day in every way I am getting better and better.”
the innate ability to be clairvoyant, as in parapsychological experiments. — cryptesthetic, adj.
a mode of thinking directed away from reality and toward fantasy without cognizance of ordinary rules of logic. — dereistic, adj.
a condition characterized by a lack of sympathy or passion. — dyspathic, adj.
extreme anxiety and depression accompanied by obsession. — dysthymic, adj.
the study of mental imagery.
theory and practice of Sigmund Freud, especially in the area of neuroses, their causes and treatment. — Freudian, n., adj.
extreme or abnormal sensitivity, as to criticism. — hypersensitive, adj.
the process of producing a hypnotic condition or state of hypnosis. — hypnogenetic, adj.
the treatment of disease and illness by hypnosis. — hypnotherapist, n.
1. the science dealing with the induction of hypnosis, especially for therapeutic purposes.
2. the act of inducing hypnosis; hypnotizing.
3. hypnosis. — hypnotist, n.hypnotistic, adj.
a state of dulled mental activity or decrease in the function of thought. Also called hypopsychosis.
hyponoia.
a condition of extreme excitement characterized by emotional disturbance, sensory and motor derangement and sometimes the simulation of organic disorders. — hysterie, n.hysteric, hysterical, adj.
1. the process of inducing hysteria.
2. the onset of hysteria. — hysterogenic, adj.
the condition of one who is not a child acting abnormally childlike. — infantility, n.infantilistic, adj.
the belief that psychology must be derived from introspective data. — introspectionist, n.introspective, adj.
psychotherapy that tries to find for the patient the aim and meaning of his own life as a human being and does not stress the medical aspect of mental health.
1. a speculation dealing systematically with concepts extending beyond the present limits of psychology as an empirical science.
2. a conception in psychoanalytic theory of mental processes involving causal relations, structural placement, and functional value. — metapsychological, adj.
the speech of a psychotic containing new combinations of words unknown to a hearer. See also speech.
any of a large variety of mental or psychic disorders, exhibiting a range of mental or physical symptoms, as anxiety, phobias, compulsions, and tics. — neurotic, n., adj.
a neurotic condition; psychoneurosis.
the process of correcting bodily or mental distortion. — orthotic, adj.
1. the pervasion of all conduct and experience with sexual emotions.
2. the theory that regards all desire and interest as derived from sex instinct. Also pansexuality. — pansexualist, n.
a reasoning disorder characterized by inappropriate responses to questions and illusiorial or delusional speech. — paralogical, adj.
the process whereby a person fails to complete his intention, as by the mislaying of objects, thought to be the result of a conflict between unconscious and conscious intention.
the branch of psychology that studies psychic phenomena, as telepathy, clairvoyance, extrasensory perception, and the like. — parapsychological, adj.
the branch of psychology concerned with description and comparison. — phrenographic, adj.
mental or psychic pain.
the method developed by Freud and others for treating neuroses and some other disorders of the mind. — psychoanalyst, n.psychoanalytic, psychoanalytical, adj.
the study of the relations or interrelations between body and mind, especially as exhibited in the nervous system. — psychobiologist, n.psychobiologic, psychobiological, adj.
1. the science or art of making a personality evaluation.
2. the diagnosis of a mental disorder. — psychodiagnostician, n.psychodiagnostic, adj.
the systematic study of personality in terms of past and present experiences in relation to motivation. — psychodynamic, adj.
a theory of the development of the mind. — psychogonic, psychogonical, adj.
an attack of mental inertia and hopelessness following a period of elation, especially in sufferers from neurosis. — psycholeptic, adj.
the theory that emphasizes psychological conceptions in other fields outside of psychology, as philosophy and history.
the science that studies the mind and mental processes, feelings, and desires. — psychologist, n.psychologic, psychological, adj.
the measurement of mental traits, abilities, and processes. — psychometrist, n.psychometric, adj.
Medicine. the science of the diseases of the mind. — psychopathologist, psychopathist, n.psychopathologie, psychopathological, adj.
a mental disorder. — psychopath, n.psychopathic, adj.
the study of drugs that effect emotional and mental States. — psychopharmacologic, psychopharmacological, adj.
an abnormal fear of the mind.
the branch of psychology that studies the relationships between physical stimuli and resulting sensations and mental states. — psychophysicist, n.psychophysie, psychophysical, adj.
1. the study of the circumstances under which mental processes occur.
2. the theory that conscious states are made up of elements capable of separating and joining without loss of essential identity. — psychostatic, psychostatical, adj.
the science or method of treating psychological abnormalities and disorders by psychological techniques, especially by psychoanalysis, group therapy, or consultation. — psychotherapist, n.psychotherapeutic, adj.
a mental condition marked by childish or infantile behavior. — puerility, n.
the scientific study of psychological reactions. — reactologist, n.reactological, adj.
the study of behavior and its interpretation according to a concept that regards behavior as a combination of simple and complex reflexes. — reflexologist, n.reflexological, adj.
a mild form of schizophrenia, characterized by withdrawal, inversion, etc. — schizothyme, n.schizothymic, adj.
abnormally rapid mental activity.
a communication between minds by some nontechnological means other than sensory perception. — telepathist, n.telepathic, adj.
the psychological phenomenon of a person identifying with the opposite sex, sometimes to the extent of undergoing surgery for change of sex. — transsexual, n., adj.
1. any abnormal condition, either pathological or psychological, caused by wound or injury, either physical or psychological.
2. the trauma, wound, or injury itself. — traumatic, adj.
a form of insanity or mental disorder in which the sufferer imagines that he is an animal. — zoanthropic, adj.
a form of hallucination in which the sufferer imagines he sees animals. Also called zooscopy.
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

psychology

The scientific study of human and animal behavior and mental processes.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.psychology - the science of mental lifepsychology - the science of mental life    
habit, use - (psychology) an automatic pattern of behavior in reaction to a specific situation; may be inherited or acquired through frequent repetition; "owls have nocturnal habits"; "she had a habit twirling the ends of her hair"; "long use had hardened him to it"
rehearsal - (psychology) a form of practice; repetition of information (silently or aloud) in order to keep it in short-term memory
inhibition, suppression - (psychology) the conscious exclusion of unacceptable thoughts or desires
behaviour, behavior - (psychology) the aggregate of the responses or reactions or movements made by an organism in any situation
extraversion, extroversion - (psychology) an extroverted disposition; concern with what is outside the self
introversion - (psychology) an introverted disposition; concern with one's own thoughts and feelings
ambiversion - (psychology) a balanced disposition intermediate between extroversion and introversion
image, persona - (Jungian psychology) a personal facade that one presents to the world; "a public image is as fragile as Humpty Dumpty"
readiness, set - (psychology) being temporarily ready to respond in a particular way; "the subjects' set led them to solve problems the familiar way and to overlook the simpler solution"; "his instructions deliberately gave them the wrong set"
anima - (Jungian psychology) the inner self (not the external persona) that is in touch with the unconscious
double bind - (psychology) an unresolvable dilemma; situation in which a person receives contradictory messages from a person who is very powerful
cognitive operation, cognitive process, mental process, process, operation - (psychology) the performance of some composite cognitive activity; an operation that affects mental contents; "the process of thinking"; "the cognitive operation of remembering"
perceptual constancy, constancy - (psychology) the tendency for perceived objects to give rise to very similar perceptual experiences in spite of wide variations in the conditions of observation
chunking, unitisation, unitization - (psychology) the configuration of smaller units of information into large coordinated units
introjection - (psychology) unconscious internalization of aspects of the world (especially aspects of persons) within the self in such a way that the internalized representation takes over the psychological functions of the external objects
stimulus generalisation, stimulus generalization, generalisation, generalization - (psychology) transfer of a response learned to one stimulus to a similar stimulus
reinforcer, reinforcing stimulus, reinforcement - (psychology) a stimulus that strengthens or weakens the behavior that produced it
law of effect - (psychology) the principle that behaviors are selected by their consequences; behavior having good consequences tends to be repeated whereas behavior that leads to bad consequences is not repeated
science, scientific discipline - a particular branch of scientific knowledge; "the science of genetics"
abnormal psychology, psychopathology - the branch of psychology concerned with abnormal behavior
association theory, associationism - (psychology) a theory that association is the basic principle of mental activity
atomism - (psychology) a theory that reduces all mental phenomena to simple elements (sensations and feelings) that form complex ideas by association
applied psychology, industrial psychology - any of several branches of psychology that seek to apply psychological principles to practical problems of education or industry or marketing etc.
cognitive psychology - an approach to psychology that emphasizes internal mental processes
animal psychology, comparative psychology - the branch of psychology concerned with the behavior of animals
child psychology, developmental psychology, genetic psychology - the branch of psychology that studies the social and mental development of children
differential psychology - the branch of psychology that studies measurable differences between individuals
experimental psychology, psychonomics - the branch of psychology that uses experimental methods to study psychological issues
functionalism - a psychology based on the assumption that all mental process are useful to an organism in adapting to the environment
neuropsychology, physiological psychology, psychophysiology - the branch of psychology that is concerned with the physiological bases of psychological processes
psychometrics, psychometrika, psychometry - any branch of psychology concerned with psychological measurements
configurationism, Gestalt psychology - (psychology) a theory of psychology that emphasizes the importance of configurational properties
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

psychology

noun
1. behaviourism, study of personality, science of mind He is Professor of Psychology at Bedford Community College.
2. (Informal) way of thinking, attitude, behaviour, temperament, mentality, thought processes, mental processes, what makes you tick, mental make-up a fascination with the psychology of serial killers
Quotations
"There is no psychology; there is only biography and autobiography" [Thomas Szasz The Second Sin]

Psychology

Branches of psychology  analytic psychology, child psychology, clinical psychology, comparative psychology, developmental psychology, educational psychology, experimental psychology, hedonics, industrial psychology, neuropsychology, organizational psychology, parapsychology, psychiatry, psycholinguistics, psychometrics, psychophysics, psychophysiology, social psychology
Psychology terms  alter ego, anal, analysis, angst, anxiety, complex, compulsion, conditioning, consciousness, death wish, delusion, dementia, depression, Electra complex, ego, extrovert, fixation, Freudian slip, Gestalt therapy, group therapy, hypnosis, hypochondria, hysteria, id, inferiority complex, introvert, mania, mind, neurosis, obsession, Oedipus complex, paranoia, persecution complex, persona, personality, personality disorder, phobia, primal therapy or primal scream therapy, psyche, psychoanalysis, psychosis, psychosomatic, regression, repression, Rorschach test or inkblot test, schizophrenia, self, stress, subconscious, sublimation, superego, syndrome, trauma, unconscious
Psychologists  Alfred Adler (Austrian), Émile Coué (French), Hermann Ebbinghaus (German), Hans Jürgen Eysenck (German-British), Gustav Theodor Fechner (German), Sigmund Freud (Austrian), Erich Fromm (U.S.), Ewald Hering (German), Karen Horney (German-U.S.), William James (U.S.), Pierre Marie Félix Janet (French), Carl Gustav Jung (Swiss), Wolfgang Köhler (German), Alexander Romanovich Luria (Russian), Johannes Peter Müller (German), Hugo Münsterberg (German), Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (Russian), Jean Piaget (Swiss), Wilhelm Reich (Austrian), B(urrhus) F(rederic) Skinner (U.S.), Edward Lee Thorndike (U.S.), John Watson (U.S.), Wilhelm Max Wundt (German)
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

psychology

noun
The thought processes characteristic of an individual or group:
Idiom: what makes someone tick.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
عِلْمُ النَّفْسعِلْم النَّفْس
psychologie
psykologi
psykologia
मनोविज्ञान
psihologija
pszichológia
sálfræîi
心理学
심리학
psichologaspsichologijapsichologinispsichologiškai
psiholoģija
psychológia
psihologija
psykologi
จิตวิทยา
psikolojiruhbilimi
tâm lý học

psychology

[saɪˈkɒlədʒɪ] Npsicología f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

psychology

[saɪˈkɒlədʒi] n
(= science) → psychologie f
(= character) [person] → psychologie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

psychology

n (= science)Psychologie f; (= make-up)Psyche f; it’s all a matter of psychology (inf)das ist alles eine Frage der Psychologie
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

psychology

[saɪˈkɒlədʒɪ] npsicologia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

psychology

(saiˈkolədʒi) noun
the study or science of the human mind.
ˌpsychoˈlogical (-ˈlo-) adjective
of the mind, or of psychology.
ˌpsychoˈlogically adverb
psyˈchologist noun
a person whose work is to study the human mind.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

psychology

عِلْمُ النَّفْس psychologie psykologi Psychologie ψυχολογία psicología psykologia psychologie psihologija psicologia 心理学 심리학 psychologie psykologi psychologia psicologia психология psykologi จิตวิทยา psikoloji tâm lý học 心理学
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

psy·chol·o·gy

n. psicología, sicología, ciencia que estudia los procesos mentales y la conducta de un individuo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

psychology

n psicología
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
OGILVY, C.M., 1994, Social Skills Training with Children and Adolescent: A Review of the Evidence on Effectiveness, Educational Phsycology, 14(1):73-83.