dependence

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dependence

reliance; confidence; trust: dependence on a person’s honesty; conditional or contingent on something: dependence on the outcome of the trial; the state of being dependent: drug dependence
Not to be confused with:
dependents – persons who depend on someone or something for aid or support: She has six dependents.

de·pen·dence

also de·pen·dance  (dĭ-pĕn′dəns)
n.
1.
a. The state of being determined, influenced, or controlled by something else: the economy's dependence on oil.
b. The state of being dependent on another for financial support.
2. The condition of being dependent on a substance such as a drug or on a given behavior: alcohol dependence; gambling dependence.
3. Archaic Trust; reliance.

dependence

(dɪˈpɛndəns) or

dependance

n
1. the state or fact of being dependent, esp for support or help
2. reliance; trust; confidence
3. rare an object or person relied upon

de•pend•ence

(dɪˈpɛn dəns)

n.
1. the state of relying on or needing someone or something for aid, support, or the like.
2. reliance; trust.
3. the state of being conditional or contingent on something: the dependence of an effect upon a cause.
4. the state of being psychologically or physiologically dependent on a drug or alcohol.
5. subordination or subjection.
Sometimes, de•pend′ance.
[1400–50; < Old French]

Dependence

 

close as the bark to the tree See FRIENDSHIP.

hang on [someone’s] sleeve To be completely dependent on someone for support or assistance; to rely on someone else’s judgment. The allusion is perhaps to children hanging onto their mother’s sleeve. This expression, now obsolete, dates from at least 1548. It appears in Samuel Hieron’s Works (1607):

You shall see … a third hanging upon some lawyer’s sleeve, to plot and devise how to perpetuate his estate.

hooked Addicted; entangled in a difficult situation; under someone else’s power or influence; devoted to or obsessed by a person, occupation, or other matter. This expression refers to the plight of a fish that has been captured, or hooked, by a fisherman, a fate which usually leads to the animal’s destruction. Hooked or the related on the hook often describes a person who is addicted to or dependent on drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, or some other potentially harmful habit; but it is used equally often in reference to one’s consuming hobby or interest.

“Poor Caudle!” he said to himself; “he’s hooked, and he’ll never get himself off the hook again.” (Anthony Trollope, The Small House At Arlington, 1864)

See also get someone off the hook, RESCUE.

meal ticket One’s main source of income; a person, skill, or talent upon which one depends for his livelihood. This familiar expression originally referred to a prize fighter who was virtually the breadwinner for his agent and manager. Today, the phrase is usually used in reference to a working spouse.

He was her meal-ticket. Why should she want him sent to the pen? (H. Howard, Nice Day for a Funeral, 1972)

on a string Dependent, easily manipulated, psychologically or financially tied to another person; unable to stand on one’s own two feet. This expression dates from the 1500s although it is antedated by use of the single word string referring to a leash or other inhibiting tie or connection.

Make him put his slippers on, And be sure his boots are gone, And you’ve got him on a string, you see. (Circus Girl, 1897)

Currently on a string is often heard in the context of relationships where one person is subject to the whims of another.

on [someone’s] coattails Dependent upon or as a consequence of another’s effort. The image is of a swallow-tailed coat, whose tapered ends naturally follow its body as sort of secondary appendages. The term is usually derogatory, implying a lack of ability to fare for one-self or to gain an undeserved benefit. Its most frequent use, as well as its origin, is probably political: to ride in on someone’s coattails means to be carried into office because a popular candidate led the ticket. Abraham Lincoln used the term in 1848:

Has he no acquaintance with the ample military coat tail of General Jackson? Does he not know that his own party have run the last five Presidential races on that coat tail? (Congressional Globe)

tied to [someone’s] apron strings Completely under someone’s thumb, totally dominated by or dependent on another person; usually used in reference to a husband or son’s relationship with his wife or mother, respectively. The allusion is probably to the way small children cling to their mother’s skirts for support and protection. Thomas Babington Macaulay used the expression in The History of England from the Accession of James II (1849):

He could not submit to be tied to the apron strings even of the best of wives.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dependence - the state of relying on or being controlled by someone or something elsedependence - the state of relying on or being controlled by someone or something else
state - the way something is with respect to its main attributes; "the current state of knowledge"; "his state of health"; "in a weak financial state"
helplessness - the state of needing help from something
reliance - the state of relying on something
subordination - the state of being subordinate to something
contingency - the state of being contingent on something
2.dependence - being abnormally tolerant to and dependent on something that is psychologically or physically habit-forming (especially alcohol or narcotic drugs)dependence - being abnormally tolerant to and dependent on something that is psychologically or physically habit-forming (especially alcohol or narcotic drugs)
narcotic - a drug that produces numbness or stupor; often taken for pleasure or to reduce pain; extensive use can lead to addiction
physical condition, physiological condition, physiological state - the condition or state of the body or bodily functions
drug addiction, white plague - an addiction to a drug (especially a narcotic drug)

dependence

noun
1. reliance, trust, hope, confidence, belief, faith, expectation, assurance the city's traditional dependence on tourism
2. overreliance, need, addiction, reliance, attachment Some doctors regard drug dependence as a psychological disorder.
3. helplessness, weakness, vulnerability the total dependence of her infirm husband

dependence

also dependance
noun
Absolute certainty in the trustworthiness of another:
Translations
závislost
ovisnostzavisnost
odvisnost
beroende

dependence

[dɪˈpendəns] Ndependencia f (on de) she wants to be cured of her dependence on tranquillizersquiere curarse de su dependencia de los tranquilizantes
his dependence on her for financial supportsu dependencia económica de ella
dependence on drugs; drug dependencedrogodependencia f (frm)

dependence

[dɪˈpɛndəns] n
(= addiction) (on drugs, alcohol)dépendance f
drug dependence → dépendance à la drogue
(= reliance) dependence on sth → dépendance envers qch
dependence on sb → dépendance à l'égard de qn

dependence

nAbhängigkeit f(on, upon von); drug/alcohol dependenceDrogen-/Alkoholabhängigkeit f

dependence

[dɪˈpɛndəns] n dependence (on)dipendenza (da)

de·pen·dence

n. dependencia, subordinación;
___ producing drugsdrogas adictivas, de dependencia.

dependence

n dependencia, hábito; nicotine — dependencia a la nicotina, hábito tabáquico
References in periodicals archive ?
The risks of physical dependence, addiction, and other negative consequences increase with exposure to high concentrations of THC, daily use, and the younger the age of initiation.
Benzodiazepines can also cause a physical dependence and withdrawal reaction when taken for longer than the recommended 4 weeks(7), a common withdrawal symptom is insomnia(8) making it hard for patients to break the anxiety-insomnia cycle.
The idea is that an addiction isn't always a physical dependence on a substance or activity, but rather the fulfillment of an emotional need.
"Schedule I drugs have a high potential for abuse and the potential to create severe psychological and/or physical dependence. As the drug schedule changes - Schedule II, Schedule III, etc., so does the abuse potential.
All nurses can help by: educating patients about issues like tolerance, physical dependence and opioid misuse; leading cultural change in pain management; advocating for their clients who may be at risk or are experiencing opioid misuse; having knowledge of community resources available for harm reduction (where/how to access take home naloxone kits and needle exchange services); and being aware of risk factors for opioid use.
This is because we began with a group of patients, although small in size, but with a high rate of depression (78.57%), anxiety (71.43%), physical dependence (57.14% for BADL and 71.43% for IADL), cognitive impairment (5714%), and poor perception of their QoL in PCS (92.86%) and MCS (42.86%).
These pathways probably account for the tolerance and physical dependence that accompany opioid use.
Most drug use is recreational, though some remains problematic and can lead to loss of functionality, mood disorders, and psychotic illnesses in the absence of physical dependence.
According to a report from The Advisory Board, a consultancy that helps health care organizations with improvement efforts, "the opioid epidemic is one of the most pressing public health issues in the United States." The study notes that "more than a quarter of a billion opioid prescriptions were dispensed in 2013" and that "inappropriate prescribing practices and patient susceptibility to tolerance and physical dependence often lead to opioid misuse, abuse and addiction" (Reducing Opioid Misuse and Abuse, 2017).
In addition to physical dependence, youth are susceptible to the social and environmental influences to use electronic cigarettes.
Administration of vitamin C suppressed the development of morphine tolerance and physical dependence in mice (3) and inhibited morphine withdrawal in guinea pigs.