piastre

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Related to Piastres: piasters

pi·as·ter

also pi·as·tre  (pē-ăs′tər, -ä′stər)
n.
1. A unit of currency equal to 1/100 of the primary unit of currency in Egypt and various other countries of the Middle East.
2. Piece of eight.

[French piastre, from Italian piastra, thin metal plate, from Latin emplastrum, medical dressing; see plaster.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

piastre

(pɪˈæstə) or

piaster

n
1. (Currencies) (formerly) the standard monetary unit of South Vietnam, divided into 100 cents
2. (Currencies) a fractional monetary unit of Egypt, Lebanon, Sudan, South Sudan, and Syria worth one hundredth of a pound
3. (Currencies) another name for kuruş
4. (Currencies) a rare word for piece of eight
[C17: from French piastre, from Italian piastra d'argento silver plate; related to Italian piastro plaster]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.piastre - a fractional monetary unit in Egypt and Lebanon and Sudan and Syriapiastre - a fractional monetary unit in Egypt and Lebanon and Sudan and Syria
fractional monetary unit, subunit - a monetary unit that is valued at a fraction (usually one hundredth) of the basic monetary unit
Egyptian pound, pound - the basic unit of money in Egypt; equal to 100 piasters
Lebanese pound, pound - the basic unit of money in Lebanon; equal to 100 piasters
Sudanese pound, pound - the basic unit of money in the Sudan; equal to 100 piasters
Syrian pound, pound - the basic unit of money in Syria; equal to 100 piasters
2.piastre - 100 kurus equal 1 lira in Turkey
Turkish monetary unit - monetary unit in Turkey
Turkish lira, lira - the basic unit of money in Turkey
asper - 20 aspers equal 1 kurus in Turkey
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

piastre

piaster (US) [pɪˈæstəʳ] Npiastra f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
The governor sent me word that my servant should be restored to me upon payment of sixty piastres; and being answered by me that I had not a penny for myself, and therefore could not pay sixty piastres to redeem my servant, he informed me by a renegade Jew, who negotiated the whole affair, that either I must produce the money or receive a hundred blows of the battoon.
1,372,640 piastres; and she gave them with an eagerness which denoted, however, some pressure on the part of the government.
It was the widow's mite-- eighty-six piastres; but self-constituted empires are always rather short of money.
As soon as his engagement with the patron of The Young Amelia ended, he would hire a small vessel on his own account -- for in his several voyages he had amassed a hundred piastres -- and under some pretext land at the Island of Monte Cristo.
If the venture was successful the profit would be enormous, there would be a gain of fifty or sixty piastres each for the crew.
When we had finished the rounds, however, he called for remuneration--said he hoped the gentlemen would give him a trifle in the way of a few piastres (equivalent to a few five cent pieces.) We did so.
From these cases and from these barrels escaped ingots of gold and silver, cascades of piastres and jewels.
A few piastres, properly distributed, help to keep one's memory green.
She is in a gorgeous oriental costume; the black braided locks are twined with innumerable jewels; her dress is covered over with gold piastres. The odious Mahometan expresses himself charmed by her beauty.
Then, according to Tsirplanlis' documents, in 1627-28 a French missionary named Pacifique de Provins, who most likely was a Capuchin working for Latin Bishop of Paphos Pietro Vespa, purchased it (calling it San Giacomo) for 70 piastres.
After 1884 and a deflation of 25 per cent of Turkish currency, stamps were overprinted in paras and piastres. The post office closed during WWI, then re-opened in 1918, eventually closing in 1923.
I'm very happy that it went from 64 piastres to almost EGP4, almost a five-fold increase.