Piccadilly


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Piccadilly

(ˌpɪkəˈdɪlɪ)
n
(Placename) one of the main streets of London, running from Piccadilly Circus to Hyde Park Corner
References in classic literature ?
When I had promised to pay for his information and given him an earnest, he told me that he had made two journeys between Carfax and a house in Piccadilly, and had taken from this house to the latter nine great boxes, "main heavy ones," with a horse and cart hired by him for this purpose.
Piccadilly was a stream of rapidly moving carriages, from which flashed furs and flowers and bright winter costumes.
Piccadilly, however, into which he shortly dragged himself, was even worse.
The Venusberg of Piccadilly looked white as a nun with snow and moonlight, but the melancholy music of pleasure, and the sad daughters of joy, seemed not to heed the cold.
He walked up Piccadilly, dragging his club-foot, sombrely drunk, with rage and misery clawing at his heart.
>From the Strand he crossed Trafalgar Square into Pall Mall, and up the Haymarket into Piccadilly. He was very soon aware that he had wandered into a world whose ways were not his ways and with whom he had no kinship.
A few rays of fugitive sunshine were brightening Piccadilly when Geraldine and her escort left the Ritz.
And here we shall need only to resort to what happened the preceding day, when, hearing from Lady Bellaston that Mr Western was arrived in town, she went to pay her duty to him, at his lodgings at Piccadilly, where she was received with many scurvy compellations too coarse to be repeated, and was even threatened to be kicked out of doors.
This is what it says: "The Piccadilly Theatre will reopen shortly with a dramatized version of Miss Edith Butler's popular novel, White Roses , prepared by the authoress herself.
I had turned into Piccadilly, one thick evening in the following November, when my guilty heart stood still at the sudden grip of a hand upon my arm.
He grudged the time lost between Piccadilly and his old haunt at the Slaughters', whither he drove faithfully.
So, Twemlow trips with not a little stiffness across Piccadilly, sensible of having once been more upright in figure and less in danger of being knocked down by swift vehicles.