piepowder


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piepowder

(ˈpaɪˌpaʊdə)
n
1. (Commerce) English history a travelling market trader, merchant or similar traveller
2. (Historical Terms) English history a travelling market trader, merchant or similar traveller
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Thirteen contested the opening 1950m handicap but very few were able to get competitive with Piepowder Court and Pat Cosgrave soon at the head of affairs.
King Edward I of England (reign: 1272-1307) originated arbitral tribunals that became known as the Court of Piepowder (Buhring-Uhle et al., 2006; Stromberg, 2007).
Spanish Arch 5g Westerner - Piepowder James Hayman-Joyce & HJ Racing 4/13-34 RPR 95h OR -He wants soft ground and I made the mistake of running him at Worcester in the spring; it was too quick and he didn't like it.
Exercee en marge du systeme judiciaire institutionnel etatique, la resolution amiable des differends s'exprime en premier lieu dans les cours des foires -- dites des << pieds poudres >> (piepowder) (69) -- car les marchands avaient encore la poussiere des champs sur leurs pieds lors du prononce de la sentence.
the universality of the customs of the sea, the special courts dealing with commercial disputes, and the activities of the notary public." (54) The law of the fairs, Schmitthoff emphasizes, was "almost as universal as the law of the church." (55) This bold statement is associated in effect with the third factor, the special courts: "International merchants sat in the courts of piepowder and of the ports in so-called half-tongue juries, [that is,] juries consisting as to one-half of native and the other half of foreign merchants." (56)
Some historians represented the establishment of such guest courts - piepowder courts, they were called in England, because of the "dusty feet" of traveling merchants - as a step toward the promotion of trade: Merchants were nearly continually on the move and seldom had the time to await the judgment of the regular courts (Goldschmidt 1891, p.
The first English arbitration was reported in 1224 in Piepowder Court, named after the pieds poudres (dusty feet) of the touring Law Merchants, who followed the county fairs to carry out arbitrations for fees.
John O'Byrne, acting for Cooleville House, went to EUR34,000 for George Durrheim's In The Wings mare Piepowder (also in foal to Bob Back) and Clonmel breeder Peter Reilly paid EUR30,000 for dual bumper winner Latin Mistress.
(16) Justice Overdo explains that he has undertaken this 'special day of detection' in order to document 'the yearly enormities of the fair' as evidence for the punitive 'Piepowders' court that haunts the periphery of the play (35-7).