Pierian Spring


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Pierian Spring

n.
1. Greek Mythology A spring in Macedonia, sacred to the Muses.
2. A source of inspiration.

[From Latin Pīerius, sacred to the Muses, from Greek Pīeriā, a region of Macedonia; see peiə- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Pierian Spring

n
(Classical Myth & Legend) a sacred fountain in Pieria, in Greece, fabled to inspire those who drank from it
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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In addition to a number of colleges and universities, Sarasota has a cottage industry of organizations dedicated to adult enrichment classes, including Pierian Spring Academy, Sarasota Institute of Lifelong Learning, Ringling College's Continuing Studies program, and Sarasota County Schools' massive Adult and Community Enrichment (ACE) program.
A little learning , a dangerous thing , drink deep or taste the Pierian Spring Education : Could do better, see me 3/10 Roy Woolmans, Conwy
A little learning is a dangerous thing; Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring: There shallow draughts intoxicate the brain, And drinking largely sobers us again.
"A little learning is a dangerous thing; Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring; There shallow thoughts intoxicate the brain; And drinking largely sobers us again." But the poet never had to think about drinking that spring water out of a polycarbonate bottle.
Again quoting Alexander Pope Drink deep or taste not the Pierian Spring,
A little learning is a dang'rous thing; Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring: There shallow draughts intoxicate the brain, And drinking largely sobers us again.
Once I've convinced myself that I've drunk deeply enough of the Pierian spring in question or when the conference is coming so close that I'm beginning to feel hysterical, I write the paper.
Alexander Pope warned, "A little learning is a dangerous thing; drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring." In other words, the less you know, the greater the danger you are to yourself and others (especially if you're practicing medicine or offering investment advice).
It is with deep trepidation and reluctance that I enter this dispute of literary interpretation as devil's advocate, taking issue with those who would praise lawyers, not bury them.[2] Having drunk a little of Pope's Pierian Spring,[3] and finding only that, the more one drinks, the deeper the spring seems to get, I find only that the more I learn, the less I know.
It's the kind of diligence any business needs when it comes down to making sales, says Jerry Dawson, business development manager for Pierian Spring Software, which specializes in educational programs.
"A little learning is a dangerous thing; Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring." Alexander Pope has been quoted often by teachers, professors and other guides for learners as a warning about contenting oneself with a little knowledge.
These three aristocratic offspring of Cappadocian Christian families imbibed deeply of the Pierian spring: all were masters of Greek rhetoric and employed their learned skills to defend and define Christian theology.