Pierre


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Pierre

 (pîr)
The capital of South Dakota, in the central part of the state on the Missouri River. Originally a small trading center, it thrived after the coming of the railroad and was chosen as state capital in 1889.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Pierre

(pɪə)
n
(Placename) a city in central South Dakota, capital of the state, on the Missouri River. Pop: 13 939 (2003 est)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Pierre

(pɪər)

n.
the capital of South Dakota, in the central part, on the Missouri River. 11,973.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pierre - capital of the state of South DakotaPierre - capital of the state of South Dakota; located in central South Dakota on the Missouri river
Coyote State, Mount Rushmore State, SD, South Dakota - a state in north central United States
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
While these conversations were going on in the reception room and the princess' room, a carriage containing Pierre (who had been sent for) and Anna Mikhaylovna (who found it necessary to accompany him) was driving into the court of Count Bezukhov's house.
"Perhaps the count did not ask for me," said Pierre when he reached the landing.
Trust yourself to me, Pierre. I shall not forget your interests."
Pierre did not understand a word, but the conviction that all this had to be grew stronger, and he meekly followed Anna Mikhaylovna who was already opening a door.
Pierre had never been in this part of the house and did not even know of the existence of these rooms.
This action was so unlike her usual composure and the fear depicted on Prince Vasili's face so out of keeping with his dignity that Pierre stopped and glanced inquiringly over his spectacles at his guide.
Pierre could not make out what it was all about, and still less what "watching over his interests" meant, but he decided that all these things had to be.
With the air of a practical Petersburg lady she now, keeping Pierre close beside her, entered the room even more boldly than that afternoon.
Anna Mikhaylovna with just the same movement raised her shoulders and eyes, almost closing the latter, sighed, and moved away from the doctor to Pierre. To him, in a particularly respectful and tenderly sad voice, she said:
Pierre, having made up his mind to obey his monitress implicitly, moved toward the sofa she had indicated.
He seemed to have grown thinner since the morning; his eyes seemed larger than usual when he glanced round and noticed Pierre. He went up to him, took his hand (a thing he never used to do), and drew it downwards as if wishing to ascertain whether it was firmly fixed on.
But Pierre thought it necessary to ask: "How is..." and hesitated, not knowing whether it would be proper to call the dying man "the count," yet ashamed to call him "father."