Pierre Curie


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Noun1.Pierre Curie - French physicist; husband of Marie Curie (1859-1906)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Martin Khechara said: "Starting with Marie and Pierre Curie and ending with the notable Robert Boyle, the audience will be taken on an explosive journey to learn about some of the most important laws of chemistry and the people that invented them."
1906: Pierre Curie, French physicist who worked with his wife Marie on magnetism and radioactivity and who discovered radium, was killed in a carriage accident in Paris.
| 1906: Pierre Curie, French physicist who worked with his wife on magnetism and radioactivity and who discovered radium, was killed in a carriage accident in Paris.
The Curies (Marie and Pierre Curie) comprised a very successful 'Nobel Prize family'.
Polish-born physicist Marie Curie shared the 1903 award with her husband Pierre Curie and Antoine Henri Becquerel for their research into radioactivity.
Pierre Curie long ago discovered that as he progressively heated magnetized materials in his laboratory, they lose their magnetization at a certain temperature, now known as the Curie point.
Media reports interpreted the gender statement as meaning that French-Polish Nobel Prize winner and radioactivity pioneer Marie Curie, who took the surname of her French husband Pierre Curie, would be relabeled as Maria Sklodowska, her Polish maiden name, or at least as Maria Sklodowska-Curie, the Central News Agency reported.
1902 - Scientists Marie and Pierre Curie isolate the radioactive element radium.
Polonium was discovered in 1898 by Marie and Pierre Curie, when it was extracted from uranium ore and identified solely by its strong radioactivity.
Much of the story takes place during the period following the sudden death of Pierre Curie, Marie's husband and partner, as she attempts to carve out a place for herself in the patriarchal world of academia and scientific research, while also contending with the romantic complications of an affair with a close married colleague.