Pierrot


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Pier·rot

 (pē′ə-rō′, pyĕ-rō′)
n.
A character in French pantomime, dressed in a floppy white outfit.

[French, diminutive of the name Pierre, Peter, from Old French, from Latin Petrus.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Pierrot

(ˈpɪərəʊ; French pjɛro)
n
1. (Theatre) a male character from French pantomime with a whitened face, white costume, and pointed hat
2. (usually not capital) a clown or masquerader so made up
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Pi•er•rot

(ˌpi əˈroʊ; Fr. pyɛˈroʊ)

n., pl. -rots (-ˈroʊz; Fr. -ˈroʊ)
a male character in certain French pantomimes having a whitened face and wearing a loose white costume.
[1735–45; < French, diminutive of Pierre Peter]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pierrot - a male character in French pantomimePierrot - a male character in French pantomime; usually dressed in white with a whitened face
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Pierrot

pierrot

[ˈpɪərəʊ] Npierrot m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pierrot

nPierrot m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
"The one with red cheeks is called Miss Smith; she attends to the work, and cuts out--for we make our own clothes, our frocks, and pelisses, and everything; the little one with black hair is Miss Scatcherd; she teaches history and grammar, and hears the second class repetitions; and the one who wears a shawl, and has a pocket- handkerchief tied to her side with a yellow ribband, is Madame Pierrot: she comes from Lisle, in France, and teaches French."
"Miss Scatcherd is hasty--you must take care not to offend her; Madame Pierrot is not a bad sort of person."
He thought hazily of ghosts; and was surprised how swiftly he could see the image of an appropriate and local ghost, one with a face as white as Pierrot's, but patched with black.
With his face in a mask trimmed with long, thick lace, looking like a pierrot in his white wrap, the viscount thought himself very ridiculous.
She who had been a broad-backed dray-horse, upon whose hind-quarters pierrots might waltz, became a colt in a field.
He gambolled in wildly and behind him twenty others perhaps, mostly Pierrots and Pierrettes holding each other by the hand and winding in and out between the chairs and tables: eyes shining in the holes of cardboard faces, breasts panting; but all preserving a mysterious silence.
If she had ever flirted on the open beach with the baritone of the troupe of pierrots, like Jane Oddy, she could have excused Arthur's attitude.
In Dakar in 2013, I asked Pierrot Gueye (1) where his son went to elementary school.
Both the plays will be performed by Pierrot Troupe, a theatre group based in New Delhi, India.
Both plays will be staged by New Delhi-based theatre group Pierrot's Troupe.
Last week's offering was the 1965 film Pierrot le Fou (The Madman) by Jean-Luc Godard, featuring Jean-Paul Belmond and Anna Karina.
This included director and story boarder Noriyuki Abe from studio Pierrot, the studio responsible for the anime series.