Pigs


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Related to Pigs: PIGSA, BRICS

pig

 (pĭg)
n.
1.
a. Any of various mammals of the family Suidae, having short legs, hooves with two weight-bearing toes, bristly hair, and a cartilaginous snout used for digging, including the domesticated hog (Sus scrofa subsp. domestica syn. S. domesticus) and wild species such as the bushpig.
b. A domesticated hog, especially when weighing less than 54 kilograms (120 pounds).
c. The edible parts of one of these mammals.
2.
a. Informal A person regarded as being piglike, greedy, or disgusting.
b. Derogatory Slang A police officer.
c. Slang A member of the social or political establishment, especially one holding sexist or racist views.
3.
a. A crude block of metal, chiefly iron or lead, poured from a smelting furnace.
b. A mold in which such metal is cast.
c. Pig iron.
intr.v. pigged, pig·ging, pigs
To give birth to pigs; farrow.
Phrasal Verb:
pig out Slang
To eat ravenously; gorge oneself: pigged out on cake.
Idioms:
in a pig's eye Slang
Under no condition; never.
pig in a poke
Something that is offered in a manner that conceals its true nature or value.
pig it Slang
To live in a piglike fashion.

[Middle English pigge, young pig, probably from Old English *picga.]

Pigs

 (pĭgz), Bay of
A small inlet of the Caribbean Sea on the southern coast of western Cuba. It was the site of an ill-fated invasion on April 17, 1961, when a force of 1,500 US-trained guerrilla troops landed in an attempt to overthrow the government of Fidel Castro.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pigs

(pɪɡz)
interj
slang Austral an expression of derision or disagreement. Also: pig's arse or pig's bum

Pigs

(pɪɡz)
n
(Placename) Bay of Pigs See Bay of Pigs
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Pigs

(pɪgz)

n.
Bay of, Bay of Pigs.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
and four little boy pigs, called Alexander, Pigling Bland, Chin- chin and Stumpy.
He had made them spacious {126} and fair to see, with a free run for the pigs all round them; he had built them during his master's absence, of stones which he had gathered out of the ground, without saying anything to Penelope or Laertes, and he had fenced them on top with thorn bushes.
`If it had grown up,' she said to herself, `it would have made a dreadfully ugly child: but it makes rather a handsome pig, I think.' And she began thinking over other children she knew, who might do very well as pigs, and was just saying to herself, `if one only knew the right way to change them--' when she was a little startled by seeing the Cheshire Cat sitting on a bough of a tree a few yards off.
But his appearance was no more unusual than the manner of his coming, there to my mother and me as we perched above the angry wild pigs. He came through the trees, leaping from limb to limb and from tree to tree; and he came swiftly.
The maid brought her a delicious printed scrawl from Raoul, expressing his love, asking her to send him some bonbons, and telling her they had found that morning ten tiny white pigs all lying in a row beside Lidie's big white pig.
Van Horn joked him in understandable terms about the latest wives he had added to his harem and what price he had paid for them in pigs.
There was a minute or two of pushing a shouldering among the pigs and the buffalo, and then the leaders of the herds grunted, one after another, "We wait," and Hathi strode forward, till he was nearly knee-deep in the pool by the Peace Rock.
He sang of the Meat-Eaters as pigs and crows, and sang how fine and good it was for the Fish-Eaters to fight and die doing God's work, which was the killing of Meat-Eaters.
The fact of the matter was that some men were taking above six hundred pigs to sell at a fair, and were on their way with them at that hour, and so great was the noise they made and their grunting and blowing, that they deafened the ears of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, and they could not make out what it was.
He also worked in the corn-fields, hoeing and husking; and he fed the pigs and milked the four-horned cow that was Mombi's especial pride.
"Her husband works hard too--raising prize pigs," said Miss Cornelia.
Luckily a butcher soon came by, driving a pig in a wheelbarrow.