astrocytoma

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Related to Pilocytic astrocytoma: medulloblastoma

as·tro·cy·to·ma

 (ăs′trō-sī-tō′mə)
n. pl. as·tro·cy·to·mas or as·tro·cy·to·ma·ta (-mə-tə)
A malignant tumor of nervous tissue composed of astrocytes.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

astrocytoma

(ˌæstrəʊsaɪˈtəʊmə)
n
a tumour of the nervous system which originates in and consists mainly of astrocytes(as modifier)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

astrocytoma

a brain tumor composed of large, star-shaped cells called astrocytes.
See also: Cancer
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

as·tro·cy·to·ma

n. astrocitoma, tumor cerebral.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
The six-year-old, from Ashton-under-Lyne, has a rare form of brain tumour known as pilocytic astrocytoma.
A case of cerebellar vermis mass in a 4-year-old girl reported as primitive neuroectodermal tumor on radiology proved to be a pilocytic astrocytoma. A case of frontal lobe lesion reported as glioblastoma on MRI turned out to be a tuberculoma on crush smears.
The term "pilocytic astrocytoma" was later used by Russell and Bland and was officially used in the 1979 WHO classification (4,5).
In pediatric patients, the most common CNS tumor types leading to ENM were: medulloblastoma (56.3%), germinoma (9.8%), glioblastoma (6.9%), ependymoma (3.7%) and pilocytic astrocytoma (2.9%) [6].
Meyer et al., "Analysis of BRAF V600E mutation in 1,320 nervous system tumors reveals high mutation frequencies in pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma, ganglioglioma and extra-cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma," Acta Neuropathologica, vol.
Medulloblastoma (WHO grade IV) is the second most common brain tumor in children after pilocytic astrocytoma [1].
Surgical resection was performed, and histology revealed a pilocytic astrocytoma. Early after surgery, the patient developed dysphagia and a nasogastric tube was initially placed to initiate enteral nutrition.
According to the company, Olson is a 30-year brain tumour survivor and was diagnosed with a pilocytic astrocytoma when he was just 12-years-old.