Pilpul


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Pil´pul


n.1.Among the Jews, penetrating investigation, disputation, and drawing of conclusions, esp. in Talmudic study.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
Woody Allen's "Hassidic Tales, with a Guide to Their Interpretation by the Noted Scholar" features six tales, followed by mock-commentaries and parodical interpretations which ridicule the pilpul (9).
In Jewish culture, the subject of happiness surfaces in biblical psalms, rabbinic commentary, Talmudic pilpul and the musings of the Mussar and Hasidic movements, to name a few.
The hidden language of the Jews: self-reproach, laden with ambivalence, not this or this either, seeing five sides to every issue, the old pilpul song and dance, obfuscation clowning as ingratiation, whose only motivation is: never offend, criticize only with a discountable barb: Genocide is made of words like these, Pound laughing.
* Leon Wieseltier talks Ruth Bader Ginsburg and peppers a well-written disquisition on the Supreme Court's ACA decision with ivrit word "pilpul." [<a href="TNR]
The Viennese choreographer Gertrud Kraus cross-dressed in The Jewish Boy and Song of the Ghetto in the late 1920s and early 1930s, and Judith Berg danced in drag throughout Poland in Menachem Mendel and Pilpul Tants in the years leading up to World War II.
Todos los sabios deben temblar ante su pilpul, su profundidad de penetracion y la anchura de su entendimiento.
I also said that I found a certain Talmudic pilpul in his finest work.
It was like the Legend of King Arthur presented as Talmudic pilpul. It was--in a word--strange, and not in the "irreducible strangeness of the original" which Walter Benjamin said lay at the heart of a good translation.
Imagine being buttonholed by a born-again yeshiva student on a flight to New York who wants to do nothing more than show off his skill at pilpul. Leo Rosten defines pilpul with uncanny pertinence: "An inflated form of analysis and debate used in Talmudic study: i.e., unproductive hair-splitting that is employed not so much to advance clarity or reveal meaning as to display one's own cleverness." And, oh boy, does Leon think he's clever.
Again, on this aspect there is an important difference: In Judaism dispute (pilpul) is stressed; in Confucianism, dialogue.