Pines


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Related to Pines: piles

pine 1

 (pīn)
n.
1. Any of various evergreen trees of the genus Pinus, having fascicles of needle-shaped leaves and producing woody seed-bearing cones. These trees are widely cultivated for ornament and shade and for their timber and resinous sap, which yields turpentine and pine tar.
2. Any of various other coniferous trees, such as the Norfolk Island pine.
3. The wood of any of these trees.

[Middle English, from Old English pīn, from Latin pīnus; see peiə- in Indo-European roots.]

pine 2

 (pīn)
v. pined, pin·ing, pines
v.intr.
1. To feel a lingering, often nostalgic desire.
2. To wither or waste away from longing or grief: pined away and died.
v.tr. Archaic
To grieve or mourn for.
n. Archaic
Intense longing or grief.

[Middle English pinen, from pine, suffering, from Old English pīne, punishment, torment, from Vulgar Latin *pēna, variant of Latin poena, penalty, from Greek poinē; see kwei- in Indo-European roots.]

Pines

 (pīnz), Isle of
See Isle of Youth.

Pines

(paɪnz)
n
(Placename) Isle of Pines the former name of the (Isle of) Youth

Pines

(paɪnz)

n.
Isle of, former name of the Isle of Youth.
References in classic literature ?
To be sure, there was one room that was always locked against her, the west gable, looking out on the garden and the hill of pines beyond.
Gilbert and Anne loitered a little behind the others, enjoying the calm, still beauty of the autumn afternoon under the pines of the park, on the road that climbed and twisted round the harbor shore.
Sometimes, in a summer morning, having taken my accustomed bath, I sat in my sunny doorway from sunrise till noon, rapt in a revery, amidst the pines and hickories and sumachs, in undisturbed solitude and stillness, while the birds sing around or flitted noiseless through the house, until by the sun falling in at my west window, or the noise of some traveller's wagon on the distant highway, I was reminded of the lapse of time.
As the motorcars passed through Summer Street they raised only a little dust, and their stench was soon dispersed by the wind and replaced by the scent of the wet birches or of the pines.
Here the Pygmies used to plant wheat and other kinds of grain, which, when it grew up and ripened, overshadowed these tiny people as the pines, and the oaks, and the walnut and chestnut trees overshadow you and me, when we walk in our own tracts of woodland.
The mountain on which they were journeying was covered with pines that rose without a branch some seventy or eighty feet, and which frequently doubled that height by the addition of the tops.
Looking across the valley, the eye was deceived by the size of things, and could not at first realise that what seemed to be low scrub, on the opposite mountain- flank, was in truth a forest of hundred-foot pines.
This fashionable watering-place, with its eastern and its western stations, its piers, its groves of pines, its promenades, and its covered gardens, was, to Angel Clare, like a fairy place suddenly created by the stroke of a wand, and allowed to get a little dusty.
If he wished for a barrel of molasses, he might purchase it with a pile of pine boards.
This smoke (or flame, perhaps, would be the better word for it) was so bright that the deep blue sky overhead and the hazy stretches of brown common towards Chertsey, set with black pine trees, seemed to darken abruptly as these puffs arose, and to remain the darker after their dispersal.
At the bend of the Danube, vessels, an island, and a castle with a park surrounded by the waters of the confluence of the Enns and the Danube became visible, and the rocky left bank of the Danube covered with pine forests, with a mystic background of green treetops and bluish gorges.
Seeing himself lost, he climbed up a giant pine tree and sat there to see what he could see.