Cymbeline

(redirected from Pisanio)
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Cymbeline

(ˈsɪmbəliːn)
n
(Biography) See Cunobelinus
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NOT SLEPT ONE WINK Cymbeline - Pisanio I have not slept one wink What does it mean?
Gina Bloom, referring to a passage from Cymbeline in which Pisanio observes that "[s]lander's breath / Rides on the posting winds" (3.4.34--35), describes the interaction between human breath and air in ways that resonate with the passage from Othello: "Because slander is made of breath, it can be picked up and moved effortlessly by environmental drafts, achieving an uncanny degree of distribution and effect" (Voice in Motion: Staging Gender, Shaping Sound in Early Modern England [Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007], 90).
Anthony Heald is solid as the physician Cornelius, and Tony DeBruno as Posthumus' servant Pisanio is a linchpin around which the story revolves.
Frustrated by the cautious pace recommended to her by her servant Pisanio, she recalls the hourglass, an earlier mode of marking time:
After her husband's departure, Pisanio's description of the event sets Post-humous in a scene suggesting the sailing of Aeneas from Carthage:
With Mikelle Johnson (Imogen), Patrick Jordan (Pisanio, Guiderius), Rick Kemp (Lords, Belarius, Sicilius Leonatus), Joel Ripka (Lords, Dr.
Orlando sends Rosalind/Ganymede a "bloody napkin" in As You Like It (4.3.93) as a sign of his suffering after a skirmish with a lioness, and in Cymbeline, Posthumus keeps the "bloody cloth" that Pisanio sends him as evidence of Imogen's death (5.1.1).
Cymbeline John Cullum Princess Imogen Martha Plimpton Queen Phylicia Rashad Lord Cloten Adam Dannheisser Posthumus Leonatus Michael Cerveris Pisanio John Pankow Iacbim Jonathan Cake Caius Lucius Ezra Knight Belarius Paul O'Brien Guiderius David Furr Arviragus Gregory Wooddell With: Gordana Rashovich, Herb Foster, Richard Topol, Daniel Breaker, Daniel Oreskes, Anthony Cochrane, Jeff Woodman, Noshir Dalai, Michael W.
When Imogen comes upon him she misreads the forms of his body for those of her beloved Posthumus: "this is his hand," she says (309), and there is a sly echo here of what Cloten said earlier when he wrested from Pisanio the letter directing Imogen to Milford Haven: "It is Posthumus's hand" (3.5.108).
There's plucky Imogen, excellently played by the diminutive Hayley Carmichael, her beloved Posthumus (played by the writer) and Imogen's maid, Pisanio, in the form of the very tall and lean Kirsty Woodward.
Pisanio. O, gentlemen, help Mine and your mistress!
32-44), and watches it pass from the Queen to Pisanio, and Pisanio to Imogen, who ultimately takes it.