adenoma

(redirected from Pituitary adenoma)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Pituitary adenoma: pituitary gland

ad·e·no·ma

 (ăd′n-ō′mə)
n. pl. ad·e·no·mas or ad·e·no·ma·ta (-mə-tə)
A benign epithelial tumor having a glandular origin and structure.

ad′e·nom′a·toid′ (ăd′n-ŏm′ə-toid′) adj.
ad′e·nom′a·tous (-ŏm′ə-təs) adj.

adenoma

(ˌædɪˈnəʊmə)
n, pl -mas or -mata (-mətə)
1. (Pathology) a tumour, usually benign, occurring in glandular tissue
2. (Pathology) a tumour having a glandlike structure

ad•e•no•ma

(ˌæd nˈoʊ mə)

n., pl. -mas, -ma•ta (-mə tə)
1. a benign tumor originating in a secretory gland.
2. a benign tumor of glandlike structure.
[1865–70; < Greek adēn- (see adeno-) + -oma]
ad`e•nom′a•tous (-ˈɒm ə təs, -ˈoʊ mə-) adj.

adenoma

A tumor of a gland.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.adenoma - a benign epithelial tumor of glandular originadenoma - a benign epithelial tumor of glandular origin
fibroadenoma - benign and movable and firm and not tender tumor of the breast; common in young women and caused by high levels of estrogen
lymphadenoma - an abnormally enlarged lymph node
Translations

adenoma

n pl <-s or adenomata> (Med) → Adenom nt

adenoma

n adenoma m; villous — adenoma velloso
References in periodicals archive ?
Prevalence of hypopituitarism: A study conducted in a tertiary care center in India reports most common cause of hypopituitarism to be a non-functioning pituitary adenoma followed by Sheehan's syndrome (27%).11 As we have excluded sellar and parasellar tumors, which remains the commonest cause, we found that 35.7% of hypopituitarism was attributable to Sheehan's syndrome, which is close to a Turkish study (107 of 388 patients; 27.6%).12 Sheehan's syndrome also accounted for the cause of hypopituitarism in 41% (15/22) of women in our study.
It has been reported that pituitary tumors account for 10-15% of all primary brain tumours.1,2 A study from United Kingdom, reported an incidence of 77.6 cases of pituitary adenoma per 100,000 population.3 Pituitary disorders present with varied clinical manifestations, which could be attributed to hormone over-production, under-secretion or compression symptoms due to space occupying effect.
Initially described in earlier part of the 20th century by surgeon Harvey Cushing, Cushing syndrome is a complex endocrine disorder characterized by excess levels of serum cortisol.1,2 It can occur secondary to multiple etiologies broadly classified as exogenous (iatrogenic) or endogenous (spontaneous).3 Endogenous Cushing Syndrome may occur secondary to primary adrenal hyper function however the most common etiology is the elevated ACTH levels which leads to adrenal hyper function and increased serum cortisol levels.4,5 Most common source of elevated ACTH levels is the pituitary adenoma in which case the complex is labeled as Cushing disease while in approximately 20% cases the source of elevated ACTH is ectopic.
Acromegaly is generally caused when the pituitary gland produces greater levels of GI than the body normally requires, which is mostly caused by benign tumour or pituitary adenoma. The incidence of acromegaly is about 6 per 100,000 people.
It is possible that a larger pituitary adenoma could cause headaches due to delayed diagnosis.
(2,16,17) Germline mutations of the genes that encode the SDH subunits predispose to paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma, type 2 gastrointestinal stromal tumor, and rarely RCC and pituitary adenoma. (18-20)
Pituitary adenoma, characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of pituitary gland cells, is one of the most common tumors in the neuroendocrine system (1,2).
Its pipeline consists of two clinical stage compounds, TBR-760 for the treatment of non-functioning pituitary adenoma, and TBR-065 for additional rare endocrine diseases.
Astrocytic tumors, pituitary adenoma, ependymoma, medulloblastoma, lymphoma, and metastatic and inflammatory lesions were easy to squash, whereas those difficult to squash included some meningiomas and schwannomas.
To the Editor: Pituitary disease is a group of pituitary gland disorders, including pituitary adenoma and other lesions, in the sellar region.[1] Typical endocrine symptoms and mass effects are likely to have harmful results on patients, families, and society.
During the preoperative period, it is misdiagnosed as pituitary adenoma in up to 40% of cases (2), although these two clinical entities can be readily distinguished based on the absence of diabetes insipidus in patients with adenoma (1).
Furthermore, two primary ACTH-secreting corticotroph pituitary adenoma cultures were examined for cell amount and ACTH secretion after seven days of treatment with levoketoconazole and racemic ketoconazole.