plagiarism

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pla·gia·rism

 (plā′jə-rĭz′əm)
n.
1. The act or behavior of plagiarizing.
2. An instance of plagiarizing, especially a passage that is taken from the work of one person and reproduced in the work of another without attribution.

[From plagiary.]

pla′gia·rist n.
pla′gia·ris′tic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

plagiarism

(ˈpleɪdʒəˌrɪzəm)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the act of plagiarizing
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) something plagiarized
ˈplagiarist n
ˌplagiaˈristic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pla•gia•rism

(ˈpleɪ dʒəˌrɪz əm, -dʒi əˌrɪz-)

n.
1. the unauthorized use of the language and thoughts of another author and the representation of them as one's own.
2. something used and represented in this manner.
[1615–25]
pla′gia•rist, n.
pla`gia•ris′tic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

plagiarism

1. the verbatim copying or imitation of the language, ideas, or thoughts of another author and representing them as one’s own original work.
2. the material so appropriated. Also plagiary.plagiarist, n.plagiaristic, adj.
See also: Theft
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plagiarism - a piece of writing that has been copied from someone else and is presented as being your own work
piece of writing, written material, writing - the work of a writer; anything expressed in letters of the alphabet (especially when considered from the point of view of style and effect); "the writing in her novels is excellent"; "that editorial was a fine piece of writing"
2.plagiarism - the act of plagiarizing; taking someone's words or ideas as if they were your own
copyright infringement, infringement of copyright - a violation of the rights secured by a copyright
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

plagiarism

noun copying, borrowing, theft, appropriation, infringement, piracy, lifting (informal), cribbing (informal) He's accused of plagiarism.
Quotations
"If you steal from one author, it's plagiarism; if you steal from many, it's research" [Wilson Mizner]
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
plagiátorství
plagiering
plágium
剽窃盗作
eser hırsızlığı

plagiarism

[ˈpleɪdʒɪərɪzəm] Nplagio m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

plagiarism

[ˈpleɪdʒərɪzəm] nplagiat m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

plagiarism

nPlagiat nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

plagiarism

[ˈpleɪdʒjəˌrɪzm] nplagio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

plagiarize,

plagiarise

(ˈpleidʒəraiz) verb
to copy texts or take ideas from someone else's work and use them as if they were one's own.
ˈplagiarism (ˈpleidʒərizəm) noun
She was found guilty of plagiarism.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
The case for plagirism was established but the authors had already retracted that paper.
Plagirism: Why is it such a big issues for medical writers?
He reads the magazines carefully and turns out stories as like the ones they are publishing as he can manage without actual plagirism." If Herbert was not aware of the original definition of his arcane word, he should have been, and should have reconsidered its use, as its teasing implication is unjustifiable in relation to Hiller's practice.