Plains Indian

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Plains Indian

n.
A member of any of the Native American peoples inhabiting the Great Plains of the United States and Canada. The Plains Indians spoke a variety of unrelated languages but shared certain cultural features such as nomadic buffalo hunting, the use of conical tepees, and a reliance on the horse in hunting and warfare.

Plains Indian

n
(Peoples) a member of any of the North American Indian peoples formerly living in the Great Plains of the US and Canada

Plains′ In`dian


n.
a member of any of the American Indian peoples of the Great Plains who shared certain cultural features, including mounted hunting of bison and shifting residence in tepees.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Plains Indian - a member of one of the tribes of American Indians who lived a nomadic life following the buffalo in the Great Plains of North AmericaPlains Indian - a member of one of the tribes of American Indians who lived a nomadic life following the buffalo in the Great Plains of North America
American Indian, Indian, Red Indian - a member of the race of people living in America when Europeans arrived
Atakapa, Attacapan - a member of an Indian people formerly living along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana and Texas
Arapaho, Arapahoe - a member of a tribe of Plains Indians formerly inhabiting eastern Colorado and Wyoming (now living in Oklahoma and Wyoming)
Blackfoot - a member of a warlike group of Algonquians living in the northwestern plains
Caddo - a group of Plains Indians formerly living in what is now North and South Dakota and Nebraska and Kansas and Arkansas and Louisiana and Oklahoma and Texas
Cheyenne - a member of a North American Indian people living on the western plains (now living in Oklahoma and Montana)
Kiowa - a member of a Tanoan people living in the southwestern United States
Chippewa, Ojibwa, Ojibway - a member of an Algonquian people who lived west of Lake Superior
Pima - a member of the North American Indian people living in southern Arizona and northern Mexico
Siouan, Sioux - a member of a group of North American Indian peoples who spoke a Siouan language and who ranged from Lake Michigan to the Rocky Mountains
References in classic literature ?
And Saxon, looking at his moody face, was suddenly reminded of a lithograph she had seen in her childhood It was of a Plains Indian, in paint and feathers, astride his horse and gazing with wondering eye at a railroad train rushing along a fresh-made track.
Great Plains Indians presents a short summary of the history of the indigenous people of the Great Plains, defined in this book as including the Dakotas, Nebraska, Kansas, and parts of Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and Oklahoma.
During the nineteenth century, paintings were the closest thing that the Plains Indians had to written records, and the majority of their paintings showed warfare and war deeds.
Exhibition unites the finest Plains Indians works of art from European and North American collections, giving visitors a rare opportunity to see the objects in Kansas City.
A useful list of references on the Fetterman Fight is included, with the introductory statement: "Television, films, and popular novels have given a mainly wrong impression of the Plains Indians, and because the more reliable books may not be so well known to the general reader, this list is included.
The reintroduction of the horse to North America by the Spanish, beginning at the end of the 16th century, revolutionized Plains Indians cultures in many ways--particularly as a boon to the buffalo hunt.
Eventually Plains Indians were forced to offer no resistance to Anglo-Americans expanding westward: Indians were relegated to barren reservations to become minions of U.
Synopsis: What was it like to grow up in the world of the pre-reservation Plains Indians before the coming of the white settlers?
He later helped wipe out the Plains Indians although he also advocated for the humane treatment of Indians on reservations.
Reilly looks at eight major events in the ongoing conflict with the Plains Indians, ranging from the Great Sioux Uprising in 1862, to the Little Big Horn in 1876, to Wounded Knee in 1891.
At least two motives were in play: to make way for the railroads and, perhaps more importantly, to destroy the livelihood of the Native American Plains Indians so they could be rounded up and placed on those concentration camps called "reservations.
However, an interesting concept is presented by Flynn, who demonstrates that the Plains Indian ways of being are easier to adapt to an urban setting because Plains Indians were a nomadic people, willing to share and needing to adapt their culture as they moved through the west.