cisplatin

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Related to Platinol: cisplatin

cis·plat·in

 (sĭs-plăt′n, -plā′tn)
n.
A platinum-containing chemotherapeutic drug, Cl2H6N2Pt, used in the treatment of metastatic ovarian or testicular cancers and advanced bladder cancer. Also called cisplatinum.

[Short for cisplatinum.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cisplatin

(sɪsˈplætɪn)
n
(Pharmacology) a cytotoxic drug that acts by preventing DNA replication and hence cell division, used in the treatment of tumours, esp of the ovary and testis
[C20: from cis- + platin(um)]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

cisplatin

n cisplatino
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This tripletherapy is also referred to as TPF (Taxotere, Platinol, and fluorouracil).
Platinol (cisplatin), which was one of the most significant
Cisplatin Platinum containing compound that form inter- and (Platinol, intrastrand crosslinks in DNA, blocking CDDP) replication and transcription.
Similar to this case the germ cell components in our case responded very well to chemotherapy and surgery but as none of the agents in Bleomycin Etoposide Platinol (BEP) are active against melanoma it therefore metastasised to other places after secondary transformation in PMGCT.
Bevacizumab and platinol based regimen were both borderline significant predictors of 12-month VTE events (Table 3).
For non-small-cell lung cancer, the most common combinations include the use of carboplatin (Paraplatin) or cisplatin (Platinol), in combination with a second drug.
The WallFlex Biliary RX Stent is constructed of braided, Platinol (platinum-cored Nitinol) wire and features three key attributes: radial force to help maintain duct patency and resist migration; flexibility to aid in conforming to tortuous anatomies; and full-length radiopacity to enhance stent visibility under fluoroscopy.
For example, the oncology drug Platinol (cisplatin) has been approved for the treatment of bladder, testicular, and ovarian cancer, and it works by "halt[ing] the uncontrolled growth of cancer cells by interrupting the copying of DNA in growing cells." (21) But, because this mechanism of action makes it useful in combating many different kinds of cancerous tumors, Platinol is also frequently prescribed off-label to treat thyroid and lung cancers.